WA Media Awards


2023 WA Media Awards winners announced


Seven West Media’s Tim Clarke has been named Western Australia’s 2023 Journalist of the Year following a five year long investigation into the history of sexual abuse charges – dating back decades – against AFL legend Barry Cable.

Tim’s entry showcases the online story which finally revealed Cable’s identity after a judge ruled the suppression orders The West had challenged for years should be lifted. It also included the front page reporting the historic $800,000 damages ruling, and the path traveled in between.

Tim Clarke 

“It was the bombshell that had been whispered about for years as one of the state’s greatest sportsmen and beloved sons fought to keep the story under wraps,” the judging panel said.

“Clarke had the scoop of the year – and it reverberated well beyond WA into the corridors of power in the AFL.

“In breaking this important and timely story, the judges noted that Clarke had demonstrated all the classic attributes of great journalism: the dogged pursuit of the facts; crisp and elegant storytelling; and, most importantly of all, beating your competitors and being first with the story.”

It is perhaps little surprise that Tim was also recognised as the winner of the ‘Legal Affairs Report’ award at the Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance’s WA Media Awards ceremony held at Perth’s ANZAC Club on Saturday, October 7.

Tim has been the legal affairs editor at The West Australian for almost 10 years, leading a team which has reported on some of the biggest legal stories in the state’s history – bikie bombings, serial killers, fraudsters, killers and rapists are all in a day’s work for Tim.

He has provided commentary, analysis and on-the-spot reporting for radio, television, podcasts and online media. He has also authored a book on the case of Bradley Robert Edwards, who was convicted of being the man that stalked, abducted, raped and murdered women in Claremont in the 1990s.

The full list of winners can be found below.

The WA Media Awards recognise excellence, independence, innovation and originality in storytelling and distinctive reporting. This can be through research and investigations, well-crafted and innovative presentations, news-breaking single stories or features, and engaging, entertaining and/or informative reporting.

Seventeen panels of judges, composed of media professionals, academics and previous award winners, this year chose 19 overall winners on the basis of journalistic excellence. Other considerations included the resources available to the entrant/s and the effort expended in the preparation of the submitted work.

A panel from the University of Western Australia chose the winner of the Arthur Lovekin Prize for Excellence in Journalism: Walkley Award winning investigative journalist John Flint, from The West Australian newspaper.

Erin Parke

Established in 1928 with a donation to the University by the Honorable Arthur Lovekin – journalist and newspaper editor and owner – this prize is open to Western Australian members of the 新萄京娱乐 Media Section and undergraduate and postgraduate students of The University of Western Australia.

“I’d like to thank everyone who entered our awards, and the awards’ sponsors for your great support of West Australian journalism,” said Tiffany Venning, 新萄京娱乐 Regional Director for Western Australia.

Tiffany gave special mention to Kimberley-based ABC News reporter, Erin Parke, who won four awards at the WA Media Awards. These were for: ‘Culture and Arts Report – The A.H. Kornweibel Arts Prize’; ‘Regional and Community: Three News Stories/Features Outside a 70km Radius of Perth’; Feature Writing: The Hugh Schmitt Prize’; and ‘Video Feature’.

Nicolas Perptich and Rebecca Turner from the ABC News and Peter Milne from WAtoday won three awards a piece, and freelance reporter Victoria Laurie picked up two gongs.

“For 11 years now, I have had the honour and privilege of being involved in the WA Media Awards, recognising excellence and the vital role of public interest journalism,” Tiffany added.

“This year’s entries are full of stories that changed Western Australia’s political landscape and led the national conversation. Congratulations everyone!”

More information: 新萄京娱乐stateawards@walkleys.com

  • ALL MEDIA (including online publications)

    Business, Economics or Finance Report  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Peter Milne – WAtoday – “Alcoa’s reputation car crash: water supply at risk, denuded forests and a toxic pipeline”

    Judges’ comments: The most heated debate in this category was around the shortlist as there were several excellent entries that showed evidence of reporters going above and beyond standard practice to reveal new and important information. These stories were not just about the fates of businesses on share markets, they were about financial justice, institutionalised sexism, the behaviour of the billionaires who control a significant portion of our economy and the security of the state’s essential infrastructure and utilities. When it came to picking a winner though, Peter Milne’s work was a standout. This piece was the culmination of a six-month investigation that started with tip-offs, that came his way because of the reputation he has established for fair and fearless reporting. What followed was a deep dive into documentation about the issue, including the results of Freedom of Information requests and careful questioning of key stakeholders. This story and others resulting from the ongoing investigation are raising serious questions about the company with the rights to mine a considerable portion of the state’s last remaining jarrah forests.

     

    Columnist – The Matt Price Prize  supported by Steedman Stagg Lawyers

    • Peter Milne – WAtoday – “Digging into the spin from the big end of town”

    Judges’ comments: Peter Milne boldly took on three big topics – the Western Australian of the Year awards, and mining giants Alcoa and Andrew Forrest. He wrote three excellent columns, expressing powerful opinions backed by in-depth research and hard facts. They were entertaining, informative and challenging. The judge’s agreed that Paige Taylor’s entry, ‘The Voice and the land rights giant’, was also very strong.

     

    Culture and Arts Report – The A.H. Kornweibel Arts Prize  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Erin Parke – ABC News – “Mystery Settlement”

    Judges’ comments: In Mystery Settlement Erin Parke has brought to national attention an incredible hidden story from WA’s north, about an Aboriginal-Indonesian cultural connection dating back at least 150 years. Requiring tenacity, sensitivity, thorough research, and great community connections and trust, Erin has once again demonstrated all that is best about journalism from the regions. The judges noted a strong field with worthy finalists, and would like to also commend Victoria Laurie and Bo Wong, in particular, for their compelling and beautifully told story of Pilbara’s Martumili artists, full of luscious palettes and rich, resonant text.

     

    Freelance Journalist  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Victoria Laurie – “Victoria Laurie freelance stories”

    Judges’ comments: The common link across all of Victoria Laurie’s pieces was the depth of research and detail, as well as the beauty of the writing and storytelling. This was an entry of the highest quality and was a reminder of Victoria’s status as a pillar of Western Australian journalism.

     

    Health / Medical Report  supported by Australian Medical Association (WA)

    • Caitlyn Rintoul – Seven West Media – “Triple shift horror: Unveiling systemic strain in WA hospitals”

     Judges’ comments: This story tapped into an issue that resonates throughout society. Using journalistic skills to build contacts and their trust, develop insights and then to unspin the government line, the reporter was able to tell a compelling, exclusive story that set the news agenda and led to improved societal outcomes.

     

    Legal Affairs Report  supported by  新萄京娱乐

    • Tim Clarke – Seven West Media – “Barry Thomas Cable”

    Judges’ comments: Tim Clarke’s coverage of the Barry Cable trial showed a depth of reporting that built understanding of a complex issue over a long period of time. Through a series of articles Tim revealed pertinent facts and details about the history of sexual abuse charges against Cable. Detailing these allegations against such a high-profile and well-regarded West Australian called for careful and considered reporting, which Tim delivered.

     

    New Journalist or Cadet – The Eaves-Prior-Day Prize supported by Cannings Purple

    • Cason Ho – ABC News – “Multimedia Journalism”

    Judges’ comments: A voice for the voiceless. Cason Ho gains the trust of families and uncovers the stories of society’s most vulnerable people. He exposes how the system that should be helping them is letting them down. Immaculate storytelling with ethics and sensitivity, plus the production and technical skills to captivate audiences.

     

    Outstanding Journalism Student Award  supported by Nine

    • Seamus Harrison – Curtin University

     Judges’ comments: Seamus is a versatile and compassionate reporter who can deliver fresh and surprising angles on issues such as ‘voice cloning’, and dealing with OCD during COVID. His feature on Singapore’s decision to decriminalise gay sex was a great piece of on-the-ground reporting, using video footage to capture in real time the community’s joy as the announcement was made.

     

    Political Report – The Beck Prize  supported by Seven West Media

    • Hamish Hastie – WAtoday – “Breaking through the spin on WA’s biggest dud property deal”

    Judges’ comments: After a lengthy debate about the balance, originality, strength and depth of the excellent entries in this category, the judges arrived at a short of three. Paige Taylor and Paul Garvey’s ‘McGowan Exits’ piece for The Australian explaining the reactions of unions and their aligned factions in the wake of Mark McGowan’s resignation was selected because it was engagingly written and gave insight into behind the scenes decision making processes. Gary Adshead’s piece, headlined ‘Labor hits trouble’, was selected because it was thorough and original work on a complex story. The winner though is Hamish Hastie for ‘Breaking through the spin on WA’s biggest dud property deal’. Breaking this news story took patience and tenacity, and involved scouring documents and a successful FOI request. The outcome was scrutiny of a deal that has not been adequately explained and a government commitment to review the process and improve transparency.

     

    Regional and Community: Three News Stories/Features Outside a 70km Radius of Perth  supported by Public Transport Authority of Western Australia

    • Erin Parke – ABC News – “Kimberley floods”

     Judges’ comments: Regional journalists need to be a master of all trades at times, from juggling vastly different competing stories, being able to quickly find a news angle that creates a strong and unique narrative, and being able to present the story across different platforms as required. This body of work encapsulates the often-frantic search for stories during a time of crisis. By allowing those affected to tell their story, Erin created strong and unique content, which she was then able to revisit to create further engaging stories.

     

    Science and Environmental Report  supported by ABC

    • Victoria Laurie – Freelance – “A Kimberley Cornucopia – Biodiversity discovery on Kimberley Islands”

    Judges’ comments: Beautifully presented feature that was lovely to read and about something most people probably don’t think much about — snails — but an important part of ecosystems. This piece provides an insight into a very remote and ecologically unique part of Australia and the world.

     

    Social Equity Report  supported by Equal Opportunity Commission

    • Nicolas Perpitch and Rebecca Turner – ABC – “Father Damian’s dark playbook”

    Judges’ comments: Nicolas Perpich and Rebecca Turner’s investigation into Catholic priest Damien Baker is a determined pursuit for the truth across time and state lines. Through a series of interviews with survivors and shared, secret documents, Perpich and Turner uncover allegations the Fremantle priest may have abused hundreds of children across multiple decades. The investigation prompted a Parliamentary Inquiry and hope of compensation for survivors, who must no longer suffer in silence. Forensic, thorough, and fearless, their work exemplifies the very best of social equity journalism.

     

    Sports Report – The Gilmour-Christian Prize  supported by Network Ten

    • Briana Fiore and Anthony Pancia – ABC – “The Fights of our Lives – A Boxing Story”

    Judges’ comments: This is a beautifully produced online work, with superb use of captivating evocative photography and videos. The interesting and complex narrative was woven artfully throughout. There was evidence of trust from the carefully selected subjects and, in line with this category’s criteria, their stories provoked strong emotion. A well researched, brilliantly told piece worthy of this year’s top sport story prize.

     

    The Arthur Lovekin Award  supported by The University of Western Australia

    • John Flint, The West Australian, “The Half-Built Home Epidemic”

    Judges’ comments: John Flint’s impressive in-depth investigation of the troubled WA building and construction industry illuminates an important feature of the unfolding housing tragedy in Western Australia, contributing to the public understanding of its causes and effects and facilitating debate about the urgency of effective responses across government, industry and community.

     

    TEXT FORMATS

    Best Headline (ten words or less)  supported by Media Stable

    • The West Australian – “The West Australian Backbench”

     Judges’ comments: This batch of headlines cooked up by the twisted geniuses at The West are quirky, irreverent, impactful, and guaranteed to get a reader’s eyes on a front page. In their crafting, they display a gift for wordplay, a deft wit, and an obsession with the comedy movies of the 90s and early 2000s.

     

    Feature: The Hugh Schmitt Prize  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Erin Parke – ABC News – “Chasing Waterfalls”

     Judges’ comments: Working with nothing more than her mobile phone, reporter Erin Parke produced an entertaining, uplifting piece that captured both the beauty of the East Kimberley wilderness and challenges faced by those looking to forge a new path through it. Parke’s writing, photography and videography helped transport the reader to the scene and give them a passenger seat on a rollicking adventure, while also exploring the broader issues of tourism, travel and how they’re changing the remotest parts of Western Australia. In a competitive field, the judges would also like to give honourable mentions to the remaining finalists: Ros Thomas’ emotional piece putting a human face on the devastating impact watching a loved one succumb to dementia can have, whist Alicia Bridges’ investigation into a pro-suicide website achieved genuine change and shone a light on the growing concerns around youth mental health in this country.

     

    News Coverage  supported by The West Australian

    • Peter Milne – WAtoday – “Tackling the rogue miner in WA’s jarrah forest”

     Judges’ comments: Peter Milne’s series on aluminium producer Alcoa’s environmental performance was the standout in this category, both for its impact and for holding power to account. The pieces were thoroughly researched and relied on the reporter’s ability to mine for documentary evidence and to see through the spin produced by government and well-funded public relations teams. It was an outstanding entry.

     

    Suburban: Three News Stories/Features within a 70km radius of Perth  supported by Public Transport Authority of Western Australia

    • Ben Dickinson – Post Newspapers – “Democracy at stake”

     Judges’ comments: The appetite – and need – for good grassroots journalism remains greater than ever. And as every community journo knows, the local government round can be a very happy hunting ground. The winning reporter clearly had fun applying a blowtorch to the Town of Cambridge for an entertaining expose. Congratulations to Post Newspapers’ Ben Dickinson.

     
    PHOTOGRAPHY

     Community/Regional Photography  supported by Department of the Premier and Cabinet of WA

    • Andrew Ritchie – Seven West Media – “Body of Work”

    Judges’ comments: Andrew Ritchie’s entry demonstrates great technical skill and a rich understanding of what it takes to tell community stories. Andrew has used creativity and sensitivity to take images which connect strongly with the audience and bring the subjects’ stories to life.

     

    Feature Photograph / Photographic Essay  supported by Media Super

    • Ross Swanborough – Seven West Media – “Pure jubilation”

    Judges’ comments: Ross’s single image of Elijah Hewett being selected for the draft is a fantastic example of a news feature photograph. The image has been superbly executed from a technical perspective, but it is the captured emotion that keeps the viewer engaged. Well done.

     

    News Photograph  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Ian Munro – Seven West Media – “Banksia Hill”

    Judges’ comments: This urgent, shocking image starkly illustrates the crisis facing juvenile detention in Western Australia. Ian Munro has demonstrated tenacity and quick-thinking, closely monitoring the tense stand-off at Banksia Hill and walking through bushland to capture a sight – a cowering boy surrounded by riot police brandishing weapons – that the public were never meant to see.

     

    RADIO / AUDIO JOURNALISM

    Audio Feature: Based on a Single Story  supported by Media Super

    • Kirsti Melville – ABC Radio National – “A Promise Frayed | When Oscar was promised the world”

    Judges’ comments: This program is an almost faultless example of the genre – an audio-rich, 30-minute story told through human relationships. The quality of the interviews and interactions in a family environment are testament to Kirsti Melville’s ability to gain her subjects’ trust and affection. What made it a winner was the way it told an important, complex and topical story about the NDIS through the impact on real lives, in a way that was deceptively transparent. Kirsti made it look easy.

     

    Audio News Story  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Isabel Moussalli – ABC – “Truck drivers speak out about hidden dangers”

    Judges’ comments: While we know about the pressures on truck drivers to meet tight deadlines and battle exhaustion, not many of us know about the often-severe mental stresses faced by truck drivers through exposure to severe road trauma – including crashes deliberately caused by motorists aiming to take their own lives. Isabel Moussalli explored the issue by revealing the first-hand effect of a suicide crash on a driver and going to other sources to question whether a national approach is needed to better support truck drivers dealing with the often-ongoing psychological impact of being the first on the scene of crashes. She has demonstrated her curiosity to pick up on a little-known issue; used her journalist skills to draw the story sensitively from her subject; and employed audio from the road to tell the story effectively.

     

    Multimedia Feature  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Jessica Hayes, Hannah Murphy and Andrew Seabourne – ABC Kimberley – “43 years a murderer”

    Judges’ comments: The story of Percy Brown and the murder he insists he did not commit stands out in what was an exemplary field of feature multimedia journalism this year. The ABC Kimberley team used their skills and the resources available to them in Western Australia’s remote north to great effect in producing a poignant, beautifully told feature which, despite centring on events more than four decades ago, resonates powerfully today.

     

    Multimedia News  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Nicolas Perpitch and Rebecca Turner – ABC – “Father Damian’s dark playbook”

    Judges’ comments: A sharp, thoroughly researched, and important series of stories told with sensitivity and creativity. Nicolas and Rebecca earned the trust of people with challenging experiences to bring a chilling story to light. The journalists’ use of video and archival material was complemented by excellent writing and photography.

     

    TELEVISION / VIDEO JOURNALISM

    Camerawork  supported by Seven Network

    • Trent Nind – Seven West Media – “Pursuit of a Predator”

    Judges’ comments: What elevated this work was the ethical and thoughtful way Trent Nind filmed, while also keeping authorities informed until they could arrive. Shots were from a distance, and only got close after police arrived. The cammo had one chance and nailed it. One of the best ‘gets’ of the year.

     

    News Reporting  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Nicolas Perpitch and Rebecca Turner – ABC – ‘Father Damian’s dark playbook”

    Judges’ comments: Thorough, sensitive and compelling. Nic Perpitch and Rebecca Turner demonstrated a commitment to remarkable storytelling through the lens of survivors of sexual abuse. The reporters’ approach was compassionate and forensic, ultimately leading to more survivors coming forward. Each story was filmed with high-quality production values and sensitivity to the survivors and their harrowing stories.

     

    Video Feature  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Erin Parke – ABC News – “Fitzroy Floods”

    Judges’ comments: Erin managed to capture a unique and compelling take on the Fitzroy Floods. Embedding herself in the community, she managed to film incredible interviews with local indigenous members and was able to beautifully capture their heart-rending experiences. But what really stood out, was the fact much of it was shot by her on little more than an iPhone. An amazing effort!

     

    GOLD PRIZE

    West Australian Journalist of the Year – The Daily News Centenary Prize  supported by BHP

    • Tim Clarke

    Judges’ comments: It was the bombshell that had been whispered about for years as one of the state’s greatest sportsmen and beloved sons fought to keep the story under wraps. And it was The West’s legal affairs editor, Tim Clarke, who was the first to reveal the stunning news that Barry Cable – a hall of fame legend of WA football – was an accused sexual predator who was being sued by a woman who claimed he had abused her for decades, starting when she was just 12 years old.

    Clarke had the scoop of the year — and it reverberated well beyond WA into the corridors of power in the AFL. He had been pursuing the case behind the scenes for five years as Cable used every legal avenue to stop the public from learning the truth.

    In breaking this important and timely story, the judges noted that Clarke had demonstrated all the classic attributes of great journalism: the dogged pursuit of the facts; crisp and elegant storytelling; and, most importantly of all, beating your competitors and being first with the story.

  • ALL MEDIA (including online publications)

    Business, Economics or Finance Report  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Peter Milne – WAtoday – “Alcoa’s reputation car crash: water supply at risk, denuded forests and a toxic pipeline”
    • Daniel Mercer – ABC – “Power failure: the foreign loan and WA’s energy woes”
    • Matthew Mckenzie – Business News – “The battle of the billionaires”

    Columnist – The Matt Price Prize  supported by Steedman Stagg Lawyers

    • Paige Taylor – The Australian – “The voice and the land rights giant”
    • Peter Milne – WAtoday – “Digging into the spin from the big end of town”
    • Kate Emery – Seven West Media/The West Australian – “Body of Work”

    Culture and Arts Report – The A.H. Kornweibel Arts Prize  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Victoria Laurie and Bo Wong – Freelance – “A Big Thing”
    • Mark A. Naglazas – WAtoday – “Why taxpayers are forking out millions for a mega-rich rock band to perform in Perth”
    • Erin Parke – ABC News – “Mystery Settlement”

    Freelance Journalist  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Victoria Laurie – “Victoria Laurie freelance stories”
    • Brendan Foster – “Body of work”

    Health / Medical Report  supported by Australian Medical Association (WA)

    • David Weber – ABC – “Hospital Detention”
    • Caitlyn Rintoul – Seven West Media – “Triple shift horror: Unveiling systemic strain in WA hospitals”
    • Jessica Page – Seven West Media – “Life and Death Pressure”

    Legal Affairs Report  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • John Flint – Seven West Media – “Sheer Negligence”
    • Alex Chance, Liz Hayes, Gareth Harvey and Sonia Serrao – Nine Network – ”The Man in the Hole”
    • Tim Clarke – Seven West Media – “Barry Thomas Cable”

    New Journalist or Cadet – The Eaves-Prior-Day Prize supported by Cannings Purple

    • Cason Ho – ABC News – “Multimedia Journalism”
    • Cameron Carr – ABC – “Body of Work”

    Outstanding Journalism Student Award  supported by Nine

    • Seamus Harrison – Curtin University
    • Gera Kazakov – Curtin University
    • Angela Ho – Curtin University/Seesaw Magazine

    Political Report – The Beck Prize  supported by Seven West Media

    • Hamish Hastie – WAtoday – “Breaking through the spin on WA’s biggest dud property deal”
    • Paige Taylor and Paul Garvey – The Australian – “McGowan Exits”
    • Gary Adshead – Nine News/WAtoday.com.au/6PR Radio – “Labor hits trouble”

    Regional and Community: Three News Stories/Features outside a 70km radius of Perth  supported by Public Transport Authority of Western Australia

    • Briana Fiore – ABC – Mark Wales – “The True Survivor, Suicide and the Catholic Church & Aged Care Non-Compliance Reports”
    • Amelia Searson and Alice Angeloni – ABC – “Stolen Generation survivor’s desperate search for his family”
    • Erin Parke – ABC News – “Kimberley floods”

    Science and Environmental Report  supported by ABC

    • Victoria Laurie – Freelance – “A Kimberley Cornucopia – Biodiversity discovery on Kimberley Islands”
    • Thomas Robinson and Amelia Searson – ABC – “The future of Wittenoom”
    • Peter Milne – WAtoday – “Revealing the true scale of Alcoas’ footprint on WA’s jarrah forests”

    Social Equity Report  supported by Equal Opportunity Commission

    • Nicolas Perpitch and Rebecca Turner – ABC – “Father Damian’s dark playbook”
    • Rebecca Le May – The West Australian – “Aboriginal women demand WA Government pay back stolen wages”
    • Ted O’Connor – ABC – “Halls Creek”

    Sports Report – The Gilmour-Christian Prize  supported by Network Ten

    • Ryan Daniels – Seven West Media – “Daniel Venables – A Brutal Blow”
    • Briana Fiore and Anthony Pancia – ABC – “The Fights of our Lives – A Boxing Story”
    • Craig O’Donoghue – The West Australian – “Perth Wildcat Bryce Cotton banned from being Australian citizen”

    The Arthur Lovekin Award  supported by The University of Western Australia

    • John Flint, The West Australian, “The Half-Built Home Epidemic
    • Josh Zimmerman, The West Australian, “Aboriginal Heritage Laws Fiasco”
    • Matthew McKenzie, Business News, “The Bubble – Construction Crisis”

     

    TEXT FORMATS

    Best Headline (ten words or less)  supported by Media Stable

    • Jakeb Waddell – The West Australian/Seven West Media – “The West Australian Sports Editor’s back page headlines”
    • Michael Palmer – Seven West Media – “Crime Doesn’t Pay”
    • The West Australian – “The West Australian Backbench”

    Feature: The Hugh Schmitt Prize  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Ros Thomas – Freelance – “Lost and Found”
    • Alicia Bridges – ABC Perth – “Fight to block pro-suicide website linked to Australian deaths”
    • Erin Parke – ABC News – “Chasing Waterfalls”

    News Coverage  supported by The West Australian

    • Peter Milne – WAtoday – “Tackling the rogue miner in WA’s jarrah forest”
    • Nicolas Perpitch and Rebecca Turner – ABC – “Father Damian’s dark playbook”

    Suburban: Three News Stories/Features within a 70km radius of Perth  supported by Public Transport Authority

    • Indigo Lemay-Conway – Seven West Media – “Tragic toddler drowning, op shop shock and dumpster diving councillor”
    • Christopher Tan – Seven West Media – “Perth’s most vulnerable community trapped in heartbreaking cycle, bots stepping in to solve driver test shortages, council blindsided by controversial drug and rehab centre Shalom House”
    • Ben Dickinson – Post Newspapers – “Democracy at stake”

     

    PHOTOGRAPHY

    Community/Regional Photography  supported by Department of Premier and Cabinet

    • Amelia Searson – ABC – “Legends of the Pilbara”
    • Andrew Seabourne – ABC – “ABC Kimberley”
    • Andrew Ritchie – Seven West Media – “Body of Work”

    Feature Photograph / Photographic Essay  supported by Media Super

    • Ross Swanborough – Seven West Media – “Pure jubilation”
    • Kelsey Reid – The West Australian – “Voices of the Kimberley”
    • Kenith Png – ABC News – Background Briefing – “Prisoner of the state”

    News Photograph  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Simon Hydzik – Seven West Media – “Kimberley Floods – The First Trucks”
    • Ian Munro – Seven West Media – “Banksia Hill”
    • Kelsey Reid – The West Australian – “Remarkable”

     

    RADIO / AUDIO JOURNALISM

    Audio Feature: Based on a Single Story  supported by Media Super

    • Kirsti Melville – ABC Radio National – “A Promise Frayed | When Oscar was promised the world”
    • Rebecca Trigger and Ash Davis – ABC – “Grim Prospects: Why did police fail to act on an outback double homicide?”
    • Sinead Mangan, Adriano Sardi and Edwina Farley – ABC – “Pink Diamond Heist”

    Audio News Story  supported by Media Super

    • Emily Smith and Andrew Chounding – ABC – “What Voice?”
    • Isabel Moussalli – ABC – “Truck drivers speak out about hidden dangers”
    • Elsa Silberstein – ABC Audio on Demand – “Leaving country for dialysis”

    Multimedia Feature  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Rhiannon Shine – ABC – “Egg Freezing”
    • Rebecca Trigger and Ash Davis – ABC – “Grim Prospects: Why did the WA Police fail to act on a double homicide in the outback”
    • Jessica Hayes, Hannah Murphy and Andrew Seabourne – ABC Kimberley – “43 years a murderer”

    Multimedia News  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Nicolas Perptich and Rebecca Turner – ABC – “Father Damian’s dark playbook”
    • Cason Ho – ABC News – “Multimedia journalism”
    • Heather McNeill – 9 News Perth/WAtoday – “Emerging from WA’s COVID-19 bubble”

     

    TELEVISION / VIDEO JOURNALISM

    Camerawork  supported by Seven Network

    • Trent Nind – Seven West Media – “Pursuit of a Predator”
    • Simon Hydzik – 7NEWS – “Body of Work – 737 Crash, Kimberley Floods and PM Visit Laverton”
    • Carl Nelson – Network Ten – “Cyclone Ilsa”

    News Reporting  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Rebecca Johns – 9 News Perth – “DEFIB Outcry to Overhaul”
    • Nicolas Perpitch and Rebecca Turner – ABC – ‘Father Damian’s dark playbook”
    • Anne-Maree Leonard – Network 10 – “Justice for Cassius”

    Video Feature  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Rhiannon Shine – ABC – “Body of work”
    • Erin Parke – ABC News – “Fitzroy Floods”
    • Jessica Hayes, Hannah Murphy and Andrew Seabourne – ABC News, Network Sunday Special – “43 years a murderer”

  • ALL MEDIA (including online publications)

     

    BUSINESS, ECONOMICS OR FINANCE REPORT
    • This award recognises excellence in business, economics, and finance journalism.
    • Entrants may submit a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

     

    COLUMNIST – The Matt Price Prize
    • This category is open to journalists involved in comment and analysis and includes leader writers, reviewers, opinion columnists and bloggers across the spectrum of discussion and debate, including arts, sports, business, and politics. This award honours the memory of Matt Price, former columnist for The Australian.
    • Entrants may submit up to three (3) pieces, not necessarily related, to be judged as indicative of their work.

     

    CULTURE AND ARTS REPORT – The A.H. Kornweibel Arts Prize
    • Awarded for the best culture and arts story in any medium.
    • The award honours the memory of Albert H. Kornweibel, who was widely celebrated for his music critiques, under the pen name Fidelio, and his reviews of books and drama.
    • Entrants may submit a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

     

    FREELANCE JOURNALIST
    • This award recognises the unique and growing contribution that freelance journalists make to the industry.
    • Entrants may submit up to five (5) pieces, not necessarily related, to be judged as indicative of their work.

     

    HEALTH / MEDICAL REPORT
    • Awarded for the best health and medical story in any medium.
    • Entrants may submit a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

     

    LEGAL AFFAIRS REPORT
    • Awarded for excellence in legal reporting in any medium.
    • Entrants may submit a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

     

    NEW JOURNALIST OR CADET – The Eaves-Prior-Day Prize
    • Open to cadets and journalists in their first full year of grading. This prize honours the memory of AJA members Jack Eaves, Selwyn Prior and Merv Day, who took a great interest in the training and development of young journalists.
    • Entrants may submit their three (3) best pieces of work, showing a range of skills and styles.

     

    OUTSTANDING JOURNALISM STUDENT AWARD
    • Open to all full-time undergraduate and postgraduate journalism students enrolled at a West Australian tertiary institution and not employed as journalists.
    • Entrants may submit up to three (3) examples of their best work.

     

    POLITICAL REPORT – The Beck Prize
    • Awarded for the best political reporting in any medium, this award honours the memory of Will Beck, a long-time Hansard reporter at the WA Parliament and a prominent member of the Australian Journalists’ Association.
    • Entrants may submit a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

     

    REGIONAL & COMMUNITY

    Three News Stories/Features outside a 70km radius of Perth

    • Awarded for the best three news stories and/or features in regional or community media outside a 70km radius of Perth CBD. This category includes broadcast, online and country publications but NOT specialist rural publications such as the Countryman or Farm Weekly.
    • Entrants must address in their supporting statement if their work was also featured and subbed in metropolitan or national publications and must upload their un-subbed copy.
    • Entrants may submit up to three (3) pieces, not necessarily related, to be judged as indicative of their work.

     

    SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT
    • Awarded for excellence in covering science and environmental issues.
    • Entrants may submit a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

     

    SOCIAL EQUITY REPORT
    • This award recognises the vital role of public service journalism and media reporting which addresses issues relating to social and economic equality, human rights, and participatory democracy.
    • Entrants may submit a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

     

    SPORTS REPORT – The Gilmour-Christian Prize
    • This award recognises the diverse skills of the sports journalist and the elements that make a great sports story – tenacity, accuracy, ethics, research, great storytelling, and the capacity to capture and share the emotion in sport.
    • This award honours the memory of Doug Gilmour, former sports editor, and Geoff Christian, sportswriter, and broadcaster.
    • Entrants may submit a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

     

    TEXT FORMATS

    These awards recognise print or digital journalism delivered primarily through the written word.

    BEST HEADLINE (ten words or less)
    • This award recognises the art of witty and succinct headlines that grab attention across all media. It is open to all journalists, sub-editors, and digital content producers whose job it is to attract readers and viewers with clever use of language.
    • Entrants will be judged on three (3) samples of their work.
    FEATURE – The Hugh Schmitt Prize
    • The focus of this award remains on quality writing. It celebrates excellence in the craft of feature writing and storytelling, with prime consideration given to the written word and research ability as well as originality, creativity, impact and technique. (This award is also open to multi-media packages where writing is the primary medium.) This award honours the memory of feature writer Hugh Schmitt.
    • Entrants may submit a single feature story or no more than three (3) related feature stories on the same subject.
    NEWS
    • This category recognises excellence in news journalism created for print or digital formats. It recognises the diverse skills of the news reporter/journalist – not just for breaking news but for all the other elements that make a great story under the pressure of deadlines. The emphasis of this award is on solid, gripping reporting and outstanding individual (or small team) efforts in covering a news story.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.
    SUBURBAN

    Three News Stories/Features within a 70km radius of Perth

    • Awarded for the best three news stories and/or features written by journalists working for a suburban masthead.
    • Entrants must address in their supporting statement if their work was also featured and subbed in metropolitan or national publications and must upload their un-subbed copy.
    • Entrants may submit up to three (3) pieces, not necessarily related, to be judged as indicative of their work.
    ARTHUR LOVEKIN PRIZE FOR EXCELLENCE IN JOURNALISM 2023

    This award is available annually for the best contribution published in an Australian newspaper or periodical produced, published or circulated in Western Australia. For more information to and to enter, visit here.

     

    PHOTOGRAPHY

    This platform recognises visual journalists producing still photography for any platform. Criteria include storytelling, courage, public impact, creativity, innovative use of technology, technical ability, and resourcefulness.


    COMMUNITY/REGIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY
    • Celebrating the best work of photographers working in regional and community media.
    • Entrants may submit up to three (3) unrelated images to be judged as indicative of their work.

     

    FEATURE PHOTOGRAPH / PHOTOGRAPHIC ESSAY
    • Recognises excellence in a series of creative, original, and revelatory images about a topical issue on any aspect of life.
    • Awarded for best feature photograph or series (five or less) on the same subject – at least one photograph in the series must have been published.

     

    NEWS PHOTOGRAPH
    • News photography encompasses a range of photography from an exclusive or spontaneous news moment or images depicting news values on the day. The images should represent a story or event not a series or a theme.
    • Entrants may submit a single image or no more than three (3) related images on the same subject.

     

    RADIO / AUDIO JOURNALISM

    This platform recognises journalism produced primarily in an audio format, for radio or digital platforms.

    AUDIO FEATURE – Based on a Single Story
    • This category recognises audio feature productions and journalistic research programs focusing on in-depth information, utilising the crafts of storytelling and/or investigative journalism.
    • This award acknowledges the unique skills required to present content for radio and digital broadcast, including podcasts.
    • Judges will recognise excellence highlighting research, impact, storytelling, investigation, analysis, and public impact.
    • If entrants are submitting a podcast series, they may enter a maximum of three episodes and no more than 90 minutes of total audio for the judges to listen to.

     

    AUDIO NEWS STORY
    • This category recognises excellence in news and current affairs journalism produced in audio formats, taking into consideration the immediacy and unique demands of the medium and deadline pressure.
    • This award acknowledges the special skills required to present content for radio and digital broadcast, including interviews and podcasts. In particular, the judges will reward work demonstrating the best elements of the platform – accuracy, immediacy, incisiveness, research and production skill, originality, public impact, and a gripping story. Judges will also take into account the time and resources available to the journalist.
    • Entries in this category may be a single news report or no more than three related reports on the same subject. A series of three related interviews is also eligible for entry.

     

    MULTIMEDIA FEATURE

    • Awarded for excellence in research, impact and storytelling of a current affairs or feature story as well as presentation including data journalism and data visualisation, interactivity, and animation, as well as new formats or modes of distribution.
    • Entrants may submit up to three works, related or in a series. A body of work (maximum 3 pieces) is also accepted.

     

    MULTIMEDIA NEWS

    • Entrants are encouraged to enter journalism that does something new or surprising to tell a story imaginatively, effectively and with impact or that connects with readers in new ways.
    • Judges will take into consideration techniques in news gathering and presentation including data journalism and data visualisation, interactivity, and animation, as well as new formats or modes of distribution.
    • Entrants may submit a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

     

    TELEVISION / VIDEO JOURNALISM

    This platform recognises journalism primarily produced in video formats, for television, film, and digital platforms.

    CAMERAWORK
    • This award recognises excellence in camerawork in Australian news, current affairs, and documentary as well as videography and photo films in digital formats, representing the highest standards of the craft.
    • Entrants may submit a single piece of footage or three (3) pieces of work showcasing a body of work.
    NEWS REPORTING
    • This category recognises the skill of producing quality news journalism in television and video formats under deadline pressure.
    • The emphasis of this award is on solid, gripping reporting, clarity of message and outstanding individual or team efforts in covering a developing news story. In particular, the judges will reward work demonstrating accuracy, immediacy, incisiveness, public impact, and storytelling ability.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

     

    VIDEO FEATURE
    • Awarded for excellence in research, impact and storytelling of a current affairs or feature story as well as production expertise and writing.
    • Entrants may submit up to three works related or in a series. A body of work will also be accepted.

     

    ENTER HERE

     

    GOLD PRIZE

    OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION TO JOURNALISM – THE CLARION AWARD
    • This award is presented to a member who has, in the opinion of the 新萄京娱乐 Media Section committee, made the greatest contribution to the profession in WA during the year.
    • The committee considers the quality of work and other ways in which the member has contributed to journalism and to 新萄京娱乐. The award is named after the union’s 1980 national strike newspaper.

     

    WEST AUSTRALIAN JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR – THE DAILY NEWS CENTENARY PRIZE
    • Awarded each year for the piece of journalism judged to be the best from the winners of all the categories.

  • Open to work broadcast, published or televised in the 12 months from July 1, 2022 to June 30, 2023.

    Eligibility for the WA Media Awards is based on independent acts of journalism, free from any commercial or corporate interests.

    All entrants must certify that their entry, apart from normal sub editorial/production treatment, is their original work and that they have adhered to the 新萄京娱乐 Journalist Code of Ethics in the work preparation; undertake to continue to abide by the Code of Ethics; and have complied with all copyright requirements. All entries must be factually based.

    Those who enter do not have to be members of the Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance (新萄京娱乐). The Awards entry administration fee, however, is waived for 新萄京娱乐 members as one of the benefits of their membership. Contact 新萄京娱乐 to discuss your membership options, or to check your membership number.

     

    ELIGIBILITY

    Entry into the 2023 WA Media Awards is open to ALL journalists and photographers/camera persons based in Western Australia, or working for a WA-based media organisation.

     

    DECLARATIONS
    1. All entrants must declare any legal complaints, defamation actions, contempt of court actions, suppression orders, challenges to the accuracy, corrections or claims of plagiarism, relevant to their work.
    2. All entrants are required to establish their bona fides and that they have adhered to the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance Journalist Code of Ethics in the preparation of their entries.
    3. Entrants must declare if the creation of their work involved payment for information or an interview.
    4. All entries MUST include a statement of up to 200 words outlining the case for consideration of an award.

     

    ENTERING THE AWARDS
    1. Entrants are allowed to submit the same entry into any two categories either as an individual, as a group or team entry.
    2. Entrants must complete a new and separate submission for each award category.
    3. Each entrant may enter ONLY ONCE in each category. The exception is with joint or team entries. In this instance, you may submit up to two entries per category. That is: one single entry and one joint or team entry, or two joint or team entries.

     

    Team entries

    1. Joint or group entries may include UP TO FIVE names, with one person nominated as the primary contact.
    2. Where a non-新萄京娱乐 member is part of a group entry, the normal $150 entry fee applies.
    3. Team entries may include any number of people with the name of the team clearly stated. One person will be the primary contact for this entry, but all names, positions and membership details should be submitted on a separate piece of paper attached to the numbered entry form when submitted with the entry.
    4. Joint, group or team entries must include SUBSTANTIAL collaboration before publication on the same piece of work. This should be clearly outlined in the supporting statement.

     

    Photographic entries

    Photographic entrants must certify that entries may be exhibited in any display organised by the WA Media Awards. Copyright holders will be acknowledged.

     

    Suburban and Regional entries

    If you are entering the Suburban and Regional category you must upload an UN-SUBBED COPY copy of your work and address if the story was then picked up by a metropolitan or national publication.

     

    ACCESS TO INFORMATION

    To facilitate easy access for judging, entrants should place URLs outside any paywall. If that proves infeasible, the entry should provide a username and password for judges, plainly indicated in the supporting statement.

     

    ENTRY VERIFICATION

    Each entry must be verified by a representative of the employer or commissioning publication.

     

    OTHER CONDITIONS
    1. Please keep copies of all material submitted.
    2. Entries will not be returned.
    3. Print/text entrants are required to provide an electronic version of their material or upload directly via the entry process.
    4. Judges have the right to reject an entry that in their opinion does not comply with the requirements of the competition.
    5. The judges’ decision will be final.

     

    WA AWARD SPECIFIC TERMS AND CONDITIONS

    New Journalist or Cadet Award

    • The New Journalist or Cadet Award is open to cadets and journalists in their first full year of grading.
    • Entrants are to submit their best three pieces of work showing their range of skill and style.

     

    The Clarion Prize

    • The Clarion Prize is presented to a member who has, in the opinion of the 新萄京娱乐 WA Media Section Committee, made the greatest contribution to the profession in WA during the year.
    • The committee considers the quality of work and other ways in which the member has contributed to journalism and the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance.

     

    The Daily News Centenary Prize

    • The Daily News Centenary Prize will be selected from the winners of the other awards categories.

     

    JUDGING CRITERIA
    • The WA Media Awards recognise excellence, independence, innovation and originality in storytelling and distinctive reporting. This can be through research and investigations, well-crafted and innovative presentations, news-breaking single stories or features and engaging, entertaining and/or informative reporting.
    • The judges will consider the following criteria, as well as those in the description for the category they are judging:
    • Storytelling ability
    • Originality
    • Public benefit and audience engagement
    • Accuracy and ethics
    • Impact
    • Writing and creative flair
    • Courage

     

    FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS

    When comparing the work of an individual with that of a group, investigative team or organisation, judges of the WA Media Awards also take into consideration the resources and time available in creating the work. That includes the pressure and demand of reporting deadlines and the location of the journalist, taking into consideration potential isolation or exposure to outside forces, and danger or pressure in presenting a story.

This video may not be supported by some browsers. If you are having trouble viewing it on this page, you can also watch it on YouTube.

Photos from the 2023 WA Media Awards Awards

Photos by Sharon Smith. If you are having trouble seeing this gallery on your phone or browser, view it on flickr.

  • All the winners at the 2022 WA Media Awards.
    The West Australian journalist, Daryna Zadvirna won the prestigious 2022 West Australian Journalist of the Year—The Daily News Centenary Prize for her coverage of the war in Ukraine.

    The 26-year-old had been a print journalist for less than three years before she took personal leave, bought a camera and independently travelled to Ukraine to tell and show the stories of the Russian invasion of her homeland. Daryna had no itinerary, no guide and no cameraman and relied on a network of family and friends as she traversed the country filming the devastation and speaking to  the people on the ground impacted by the war.

    With no prior camera experience she returned after five weeks, with 17 hours of footage and interviews, which resulted in the documentary, “My Ukraine: Inside the warzone”, which won the Video Feature category, produced by Natalie Bonjolo, Daryna and The West Australian team.

    Daryna also won the Feature Photograph/Photographic Essay category for her “My Ukraine: Inside the Warzone”, Sunday Times Magazine, The West Australian piece, and was part of the team who took out the Multimedia Feature prize for The West Australian video series, “Foul Play — The Tiny Pinder Story”.

    In awarding Daryna the top prize, the judges said: “Displaying tremendous personal courage and commitment to her craft, Daryna Zadvirna created the absolute stand-out piece of journalism of the year.

    “Her stunning footage and wealth of interviews with everyday Ukrainians combined to build an intensely personal account of the suffering the war has brought to the country of her birth – and the determination of its people to prevail in the face of overwhelming odds.

    “The judges were impressed with the sensitivity with which she handled her subject matter and her superb story-telling that wove a compelling narrative.

    “The result was an emotionally powerful portrait of the horrors of the invasion.”

    Mark Duffield was awarded The Clarion Award for Outstanding Contribution. Mark began his career in 1982 when he joined The South Western Times before moving to The West Australian in 1984. For close to four decades, he has been the much loved Chief Football Writer for The West Australian. However, this year, Mark announced a new chapter, leaving to join the Sports Entertainment Network (SEN) to take up a new role, hosting his own morning program.

    新萄京娱乐 WA President for Media, Kate Ferguson said: “Congratulations to the winners and finalists this evening. Despite the ongoing challenges facing the media industry, the engagement with the awards continues to grow year on year. We should be proud of the quality and range of work produced from Western Australia. It continues to be among the best in the country”.

    Print/Text

    News Coverage
    Supported by The West Australian

    • Josh Zimmerman, The West Australian, “St John WA: The Fall of Michelle Fyfe”

    Zimmerman made this story his own when he revealed that two ambulance officers could have attended to a Geraldton woman who died while waiting for treatment if they had been given permission to work overtime. The revelation heaped pressure on embattled St John Ambulance boss Michelle Fyfe, with Zimmerman demonstrating that ambulance ramping played no role in the death and later revealing that Ms Fyfe had fallen on her sword after weeks of speculation over her future. This series of reports provides a fine example for journalists as to how important it is for them to continue to dig, probe and challenge authorities on matters of public interest.

     

    Feature WritingThe Hugh Schmitt Prize
    Supported by Steedman Stagg Lawyers

    • Tim Clarke, The West Australian, “Whyte Lies”

    Confronted with one of the most disgraceful cases of fraud in WA Government history, Clarke’s writing effortlessly guides the reader through the complexities of Paul Whyte’s decision to steal millions meant for the State’s most vulnerable. Given much of the evidence of Whyte’s fraud played out in financial documents, the judges were struck by the reporter’s ability to look beyond the legalese and craft a compelling account of the case.

     

    Headline Journalism
    Supported by Media Stable

    • The West Australian Editorial Backbench, “Novak’n Worries”, “C’mon Aussie Cummins C’mon” and “Does he know his a*** from his Albo?”

    The West Australian’s backbench loves a pun, but these headlines went beyond a play on words, setting the mood and tone for the news of the day. They were clever, attention grabbing and drove an emotional response – whether laughter or anger in any reader seeing the headline. Anthony Albanese’s mis-steps on key facts triggered a classic election front page that didn’t pick a side, but certainly called out the chaos of the leader at the time. There would be few West Australians who grew up with 90s cricket who weren’t singing the ‘Come on, Aussie’ theme song hoping it would be Pat Cummins who would lead our team into the next generation. And Novak Djokovic became such a decisive figure during the COVID debate internationally so as a judge made a ruling on his competition future, the West’s headline captured the vibe instantly.

     

    Suburban—Three Stories/Feature within a 70km radius of Perth
    Supported by The Public Transport Authority

    • Indigo Lemay-Conway, PerthNow, Sound Telegraph, The West Australian and Sunday Times, “Catch my drift”, “MP recalls own story of FIFO harassment” and “First-aid delay for bad burn angers mum”

    Indigo’s entry showcased three strong hot-topic stories with a terrific breadth of scope. Written with a touch of flair and deft turn of phrase, these included a positive spin on a demonised part of Aussie youth/car culture, and a heart-wrenching must-read for any parent about a childcare centre incident. The judges were impressed by these stories’ potential to be of great benefit to the community.

     

    Photography

    Community/Regional Photography
    Supported by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet

    • Jessica Hayes, ABC, “Body of Work”

    The strength of Jessica’s entry was in both the variety and quality images submitted, working in her favour to elevate Jessica above other submissions. Her body of work is a great example of making the most of what photographers might encounter on assignment throughout the remote regions of Western Australia. Well done.

     

    News Photograph
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Colin Murty, The Australian, “Little Girl Found”

    There was only one News story in W.A this year and it was “Cleo”. Colin has captured the innocent and the evil. The amazing and innocent smile of a little girl the world wanted to hear was safe, cuddled into her mother’s arms, looking at him, and the face of evil staring down his lens. Chilling and emotional. These are exceptional pictures from a horrific story that will never be forgotten.

     

    Feature Photograph/Photographic Essay
    Supported by Media Super

    • Daryna Zadvirna, Sunday Times Magazine, The West Australian, “My Ukraine: Inside the Warzone”

    What would you do if your country of birth was brutally invaded by a powerful neighbour ?
    Ukrainian born The West Australian journalist Daryna Zadvirna grabbed a new camera and took off on a personal odyssey to document the destruction of her country and the lives of her compatriots – without the usual media entourage of minders, fixers and guards. Daryna’s images are sometimes poignant, sometimes searing – and unforgettable. Epic.

     

    Television/Audio-visual Journalism

    News Reporting
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Jerrie Demasi, 9 News Perth, “WA Health Crisis”

    Jerri Demasi’s reporting on the death of an elderly woman, while waiting for an ambulance, was textbook public benefit journalism. Demasi’s stories stood out amongst the large volume of news coverage on WA’s health crisis, by exposing not only the tragic reality of the crisis, but the unacceptable behaviour by those entrusted to look after us which, without good journalism, would likely have gone unnoticed. Demasi treated the story with an exceptional level of dignity, while also ensuring those responsible were held to account. This ultimately led to the resignation of a CEO and forced the State Government into action.

    A highly commended is extended to Geof Parry’s reporting from Ukraine. Geoff’s work was some of the best internationally, as he covered exclusive angles, with a well considered and personable approach. Geoff brought the foreign conflict into our living rooms and provided a powerful and raw perspective. Congratulations to Geoff for providing the audience with a highly skilled and original insight into the lived experience of conflict.

     

    Video Feature
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Natalie Bonjolo, Daryna Zadvirna, Shivanka Samarajiwa, Alexander Smith and Troy Lemmey, The West Australian, “My Ukraine: Inside the warzone”

    While tens of thousands of Ukrainians were trying to find ways out of their war-torn homeland, Daryna was sitting in Perth determined to find a way in. She was devastated by what she was seeing on TV and hearing from friends and families. In an incredible act of bravery, Daryna put in for leave from The West, bought her own camera and headed inside the war zone. She had no itinerary, no security and no previous experience behind a camera lens. But her knowledge of her place of birth, ability to speak the language and feel genuine empathy for the people she interviewed, guaranteed a personal and high quality insight. Back in Perth, the team of Natalie, Shivanka, Alexander and Troy helped transform hours and hours of footage into the video feature so deserving of this award.

     

    Radio/Audio Journalism

    Audio News Story
    Supported by the Judith Neilson Institute                    

    • Sean Tarek Goodwin, ABC, “In the pits: Mental health in Australia’s biggest mining town”

    Sean’s story was a sharp and incisive look into an issue having a huge impact on people’s lives. It took an ongoing inquest and fleshed it out, making the court proceedings real for listeners. It also asked poignant questions about the WA Government’s response to the event itself, and the ongoing issue of youth mental health. The production values were high, the script was well written, and the interviews Sean carried out were obviously done with great care.

     

    Audio Feature — Based on a Single Story
    Supported by Media Super

    • Erin Parke, ABC, “How to Catch a Fugitive”

    All of the pieces in this category were of a very high standard and the judges commended the finalists for producing such exemplary work across diverse topics.
    Overall though, Erin Parke’s winning entry was a ripping yarn, very well told.
    It demonstrated dogged skills in investigative journalism, combined with thoughtful scripting and production. Impressive.

     

    Multimedia

    Multimedia News
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Hamish Hastie, WAToday, “Federal Election Body of Work”

    Hamish Hastie’s investigative coverage before and after the 2022 federal election demonstrates clear-cut commitment to driving stories of public interest. His diligence with translating statistics into tangible, accessible infographics brings vital context to stories of impact for a digital audience. His reporting is forensic, fair and fascinating.

     

    Multimedia Feature
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Aleisha Preedy, Daryna Zadvirna, and Josh Cable, The West Australian, “Foul Play”

    “Foul Play” was beautifully produced and drew in audiences through a variety of media to tell a story which remains painfully relevant today. The level of access to past Perth Wildcats figures and extensive research added depth and context to the engaging docuseries and its accompanying articles.

     

    All Media (including online publications)

    Freelance
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Giovanni Torre, The Saturday Paper and National Indigenous Times, “Body of Work”

    Giovanni has delivered a powerful series of stories which get to the heart of several crises in resource rich WA. By pounding the pavement and immersing himself in the communities he is reporting on – particularly with the impressive Fitzroy Crossing feature – Giovanni has been able to deliver moving insights which go beyond the data.

     

    Camerawork
    Supported by Seven Network

    • Simon Hydzik, 7NEWS Perth, “War in Ukraine”

    Journalists who have worked with Simon know he puts his blood, sweat and tears into each assignment. Sleep often comes second. But during his 12-weeks as a Seven network camera operator at the height of conflict in Ukraine, Simon surpassed his own high standards.
    Firstly, it was his first time inside a war zone. Secondly, filming with veterans Chris Reason and Geoff Parry brings with it demands to go above and beyond. Whether it be capturing the ground level drama and destruction by shooting innovative pieces to camera with a gimbal, or the destruction from a bird’s eye drone view, Simon used all his skills in dangerous and unpredictable conditions. Simon’s camerawork inside the biggest story on the planet was world class.

     

    Political Report — The Beck Prize
    Supported by Seven West Media

    • Paul Garvey, The Australian, “Powerbroken: Inside WA’s dysfunctional Liberals”

     

    Health/Medical Report
    Supported by Australian Medical Association

    • Paige Taylor and Paul Garvey, The Australian, “Rivers of Grog”

    Relentless journalism at its best where two reporters were determined to expose the truth behind policies governing the alcohol-fuelled health crisis in the Kimberley. On the back of private data sourced through contacts, their stories revealed how the McGowan Government went against recommendations from the Police Commissioner and Chief Health Officer — who want to outlaw or restrict the sale of alcohol altogether.

     

    Science and Environmental Report
    Supported by the ABC

    • Erin Parke, ABC, “Pandemic Surge in Illegal Foreign Fishing”

    A perfect example of a journalist using her contacts, experience and local knowledge to break a significant story with international reverberations. Erin’s reporting turned the spotlight on the environmental damage being done off Broome by illegal foreign fishers. By exposing the issue and then doggedly following up her initial reports, she forced the Federal Government to take long-overdue action to protect marine parks.

     

    Business, Economics or Finance Report
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Peter Milne, WAtoday, “Calling out working with Shell as a dangerous hell”

     

    Legal Affairs Report
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Paul Garvey and Paige Taylor, The Australian, “The battle for Carol”

    A deeply insightful report on an event that captured national attention. Garvey and Taylor told us the story behind the news, by connecting with key family members and digging deep to find out what really happened. The story was expertly written, delving into legal issues that could affect numerous families while holding the readers’ attention to the very end. A clear winner.

     

    Sports Report — The Gilmour-Christian Prize
    Supported by Network Ten

    • Steve Butler, The West Australian, “Rare Herb Elliott exclusive”

    The fastest man over 1500m, for years it has proven hard to catch Herb Elliott, but Steve Butler never gave up. Through a creative design, in both print and multimedia form, he has told Elliott’s story in a way it hadn’t been told before. Steve’s exclusive report on the uncovered letters of Herb Elliott included everything the judges were looking for – tenacity, accuracy, research, emotion and overall great storytelling.

     

    Social Equity Report
    Supported by the Equal Opportunity Commission

    • Annabel Hennessy, The West Australian, “Broken Communities”

    Annabel Hennessy’s exclusive series revealing the contents of a report a state government department would have preferred to keep secret sparked a police raid on a whistleblower and exposed the lengths Communities would go to in order to stop leaks about racism inside the department charged with looking after our most vulnerable people. She reported fearlessly on the raid which occurred in front of a young child, highlighted the inadequate responses of the Minister, and followed it up with another report on the fact that police dropped the charges in the end as the raid wasn’t “in the public interest”.

     

    Regional and Community – Three News Stories/Features outside a 70km radius of Perth
    Supported by the Judith Neilson Institute

    • Sam Tomlin, Hannah Barry, Erin Parke, Hinako Shiraishi and Eddie Williams, ABC, “Coverage of Youth Crime in the Kimberley”

    ABC’s Kimberley’s dogged reporting on youth crime in the state’s north drew on human experience, trusted sources and leaked documents to uncover the shocking impact entrenched disadvantage can have on children and the broader community. The team’s coverage of the escalating issue went beyond the initial headline grabbing vision of kids posting their exploits on social media to expose the state government’s lack of funding and track record of empty promises to address the issue. It is a shining example of why regional journalism is important to continue to hold those in power, often based in city offices thousands of kilometres away, to account.

     

    New Journalist or Cadet — The Eaves-Prior-Day Prize
    Supported by Cannings Purple

    • Keane Bourke, ABC, “Body of Work”

    Keane is an accomplished and technically versatile reporter who can break stories and find fresh angles on even the biggest issues. His exclusive on the COVID patients forced to self-isolate in a park, which he filmed himself, showed a dogged determination to deliver a scoop, and he is just as comfortable interviewing the Premier about the State Budget as he is delivering quirky stories on cafe culture.

     

    Culture and Arts Report — The A.H. Kornweibel Arts Prize
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Erin Parke and Andrew Seabourne, ABC, “Kimberley Girl”

    “Kimberley Girl” is a story imbued with impact and flair, both important and uplifting. Erin Parke clearly garnered significant trust, and combines compelling protagonists with keen storytelling craft, leading a small regional story onto the national stage. The story has sweep, heft, integrity and heart, and is a worthy winner.

     

    Columnist—The Matt Price Prize
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Ben Harvey, The West Australian, “Up Late with Ben Harvey”

    ‘Up Late With Ben Harvey’ is an innovative approach to comment and analysis. His nightly videos contain the best features of a traditional written column delivered in a new and entertaining medium. The team putting together the online video program incorporates high production values and extensive research on topics covered, combined with Ben’s cheeky and outspoken ‘love him or leave him’ approach to tackling topical issues and people.

     

    Outstanding Journalism Student Award
    Supported by Nine

    • Charles Mills, Curtin University

    Charles’ entry showcased his writing and research skills and emerging aptitude for multiplatform storytelling. His ‘Donating in Vein’ feature was a particular standout. Charles clearly put his interviewees at ease, allowing them to open up and discuss personal topics. Based on this body of work, Charles could easily slot into any newsroom and has a bright future ahead.

     

    The Arthur Lovekin Award
    Supported by The University of Western Australia

    ●      Peter de Kruijff, WAtoday

     

    West Australian Journalist of the Year — The Daily News Centenary Prize
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Daryna Zadvirna, The West Australian

    Displaying tremendous personal courage and commitment to her craft, Daryna Zadvirna created the absolute stand-out piece of journalism of the year. Her stunning footage and wealth of interviews with everyday Ukrainians combined to build an intensely personal account of the suffering the war has brought to the country of her birth – and the determination of its people to prevail in the face of overwhelming odds. The judges were impressed with the sensitivity with which she handled her subject matter and her superb story-telling that wove a compelling narrative. The result was an emotionally powerful portrait of the horrors of the invasion.

     

    Outstanding Contribution to Journalism — The Clarion Award
    Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Mark Duffield

    The Clarion Prize goes to a member of the Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance who has, in the opinion of 新萄京娱乐’s Media Section Committee, made an outstanding contribution to journalism and the union in WA.

    Tonight’s winner started, as many a good journo does, out in the regions when he commenced at the South Western Times in 1982.

    His natural flair and eye for a story saw him move to The West Australian in 1984, where he rose to the top of his field in almost 38 years of distinguished reporting and workplace leadership.

    He is not only good at finding scoops, he is a fine writer of news, feature and comment reports.

    He can infuse personality, passion, professionalism and insight into even the most pedestrian of sports reporting.

    It ain’t just liniment, waffle by the player “put up” by the club and coach obfuscation when our reporter takes to the keyboard or the airwaves.

    His final spread at The West Australian listed his favourite moments, including:

    • Pat Cash’s win in the 1986 Davis Cup Final;
    • Eagle Peter Matera’s five-goal performance in the 1992 AFL grand final;
    • Cathy Freeman’s 400 metre gold medal at the 2000 Olympics;
    • Northerly’s Cox Plate win in 2002, and
    • Fremantle’s qualifying win against Geelong in 2013 in Geelong.

    Of course, a cynic might question how an AFL preliminary final win matches up with an Olympic running gold medal or AFL premierships.

    But flag-free Freo’s inclusion made sense by the time we had read to the end – the Dockers had made the most of some off-field antics when skinning the Cats.

    Our reporter has a knack for drawing us into a yarn and keeping up reading with clear writing and subtle hints about what it is coming. There’s more to life than an inverted pyramid.

    He is renowned as a tough but fair and decent reporter, with one former club public relations officer saying: “He was always courteous even when he was giving us hell.”

    But tonight’s winner didn’t just write about teams, he embodied them. Whether it was coaching new and younger reporters, he was an on-field leader and off-field confidante.

    He has been an important guide for 新萄京娱乐 and the House Committee in various dealings with WA Newspapers over the decades.

    A popular and sensitive man, he could summarise the views and feelings of his colleagues.

    This might either be articulated at a union meeting, or be in the form of some quiet advice at the right time.

    His wise and considered counsel has been welcomed and appreciated over the years.

    Despite having his own decisions about his future to make in very recent times, our winner still made sure to provide support to his colleagues and invaluable guidance to the House Committee and 新萄京娱乐.

    His guidance will be missed by the West’s House Committee.

    His top rate sports writing will be missed by readers of The West Australian.

    The winner of the 2022 Clarion Prize is Mark Duffield.

  • PRINT/TEXT CATEGORIES

    News Coverage Supported by The West Australian

    • Caitlyn Rintoul, The West Australian, “Mining for change: Unearthing sex assault shame in WA’s resources sector”

    Judges’ comments: Caitlyn Rintoul’s Mining for Change targets a stronghold of “blokey” culture, exposing some of the obstacles facing women in remote mining camps. Despite an initial lack of cooperation from the big miners, Caitlyn won her subjects’ trust, giving them the confidence to tell deeply personal stories. What would once have been career-threatening whistle-blowing instead became a clarion call for change, with the companies putting measures in place to improve the culture, and a Parliamentary inquiry established. Journalism at its best. The judges also salute Hamish Hastie’s perspicacity in picking a fight with media heavyweight Kerry Stokes over COVID exemption.

     

    Feature Writing – The Hugh Schmitt Prize Supported by Steedman Stagg Lawyers

    • Marta Pascual Juanola, WAtoday.com.au, “‘Wrong skin’ tragedy: death, drugs and violence in a divided town”

    Judges’ comments: Marta’s account of one harrowing night in a young lady’s life, tragically cut short at the hands of another whose circumstances had so deeply failed him, is a masterclass in storytelling.
    Her feature, which highlights issues faced by the Martu community in WA’s iron ore kingdom, strikes the perfect balance between clarity, brevity and newsworthiness in a single, well-produced package.

    Special mention goes to Simon Collins. Simon perfectly captured the behind-the-scenes story of those in the events industry who were on the brink of collapse due to COVID. The rare interviews and insights he secured showcase how trusted he is within the music scene.

     

    Headline Journalism Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Glynn Greensmith, The Western Independent, “The Western Independent”

    Judges’ comments: Curtin University’s Western Independent was a deserving winner of the 2021 Headline Journalism award. Editor Glynn Greensmith deftly pivoted the President of the People’s Republic of China into this year’s standout, with his banner “I Xi You” leading a write-up about Chinese government surveillance. The “He Shed, She Shed” headline, introducing a story about the women’s shed movement, solidified this entry at the top of the page. The judges recognised the work of the West Australian backbench, noting international praise for ‘Don let the door hit you on the way out’, which perfectly captured sentiment after the US election.

     

    Suburban—Three Stories/Feature within a 70km radius of Perth Supported by Public Transport Authority

    • Victoria Rifici, Western Suburbs Weekly newspaper and online at Perth Now and The West Australian, “Chaos at western suburbs councils”

    Judges’ comments: Victoria tapped into the national debate around the treatment of women in politics and brought it home, revealing the double standards that persist in local government and the dysfunction it causes. The trust she built with her source lead others to share their experience as well, showing the power of building relationships in and out of the council chambers.


    PHOTOGRAPHY CATEGORIES

    Community/Regional Photography Supported by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet

    • Hinako Shiraishi, ABC Kimberley, “Peanut the Calf”

    Judges’ comments: Hinako’s photo is quirky, fun and definitely one of a kind. It would have only come about thanks to local connections. The photo immediately grabs the reader’s attention and entice them to click on the story online or on the mobile app.

     

    News Photograph Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Colin Murty, The Australian, “News 2021”

    Judges’ comments: Colin produced a creative, comical and powerful photo of Premier Mark McGowan. It is something different to the stock-standard press pack photo. While it was a cheeky photo on the day of publication, two days later the Premier became the king of WA after his party’s landslide win.

    A special mention goes out to Elise Van Aken who threw herself into the deep end to cover Cyclone Seroja and take great photos of devastated locals, despite not having power or hot water in her own home.

     

    Feature Photograph/Photographic Essay Supported by Media Super

    • Danella Bevis, The West Australian, “Blue”

    Judges’ comments: The presence of a perfectly placed kingfisher in a portrait of a First Nations woman from a tour company that bears the bird’s name takes this striking image to a totally different plane. The photographer has produced a compelling insight into the complex relationships of people within the wider environment. It’s the essence of ‘country’.  


    TELEVISION/AUDIO-VISUAL JOURNALISM

    News Story or Feature Supported by Seven Network

    • Gary Adshead and Kamin Gock, WAtoday and Nine News Perth, “The Death of Aishwarya”

    Judges’ comments: Through a powerful interview, the team brought matters of significant public interest to light and gave dignity to a grieving family failed in their hour of greatest need. Equally commendable is the sustained coverage that followed, putting pressure on the government to address systemic issues in the health service.


    RADIO/AUDIO JOURNALISM

    News Story or Feature Supported by Media Super                        

    • Alex Mann, ABC RN Background Briefing, “The Base Tapes”

    Judges’ comments: Brave, powerful and demonstrating investigative journalism at its finest, The Base Tapes is a confronting story for all Australians. Featuring in-depth research, quality writing and superb production values, Alex and his team combined extensive modern and traditional investigative techniques, often at their own risk, to shine a light on the growing underbelly of far right groups and make a compelling case to have The Base declared a terrorist organisation in Australia.

    The judges also awarded a Highly Commended to the “Claremont: The Trial” for its comprehensive coverage of the story that gripped the state, delivering insight and educated commentary that provided additional context to a captive audience.


    MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM

    Multimedia Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Rhiannon Shine, ABC News Online, ABC Perth Instagram and ABC News YouTube, “’A Courageous Woman’”

    Judges’ comments: Rhiannon Shine’s compelling piece tells Alysha’s story with a unique sense of compassion and sensitivity across the full suite of multimedia platforms. Her creativity as well as deft approach to digital story telling that involves more than three components including social media and online shines a light on the power of new age journalism.


    ALL MEDIA (including online publications)

    Freelance Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Sandra Di Girolamo, Seven Network, “Flashpoint: Coward’s Collar”

    Judges’ comments: In-depth news coverage is rare in the WA media – especially the electronic media – so Sandra’s coverage of the death of Peppe Raco stands out simply because of its thoroughness. By the end we feel we know the victim and his family, who continue to suffer as a result of this vicious one-punch crime. However, the real skill in the piece is the way Sandra uses interviews, archival footage and dramatisation – all vividly photographed and sharply edited – to tell the story of the attack and the impact on the family. The judges found Judas Collar to be first-rate visual storytelling.

     

    Camerawork Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Simon Hydzik, Matt Anderson and Frank Gradisen, 7NEWS, Sunrise and The Latest, “Cyclone Seroja Coverage”

    Judges’ comments: Seven’s coverage of Cyclone Seroja sets the gold standard for natural disaster news coverage in Western Australia.

    The network are to be commended for their innovative use of live drone video for news crosses and fly-through drone visuals for stand ups, in combination with well-executed on the ground coverage. Overall, a determined effort to cover all angles in detail, including a diversity of storytelling across the effected regions.

    It is worthy to note, their equally determined and detailed follow-up on the region’s recovery led to public donations and political aid. An outstanding effort.

     

    Political Report – The Beck Prize Supported by The West Australian

    • Gareth Parker, WAToday.com.au and 6PR, “Chief casino officer’s ‘regular fishing trips’ with Crown Perth bosses”

    Judges’ comments: In a year that the McGowan Government maintained an ironclad grip on message management, an exceptional field of finalists were vying for the Beck Prize.

    But 6PR breakfast presenter Gareth Parker’s journalism demonstrated the importance of reporters continuing to dig, probe and challenge every aspect of Government administration. By seizing on the Government’s lukewarm response to scrutiny of Crown’s behaviour in the Eastern States, Parker exposed the lax Government supervision of WA’s only casino with a bombshell news story that shone a light on conflicts and cronyism in WA’s corridors of power. Parker’s exclusive story was widely seen as a tipping point for the McGowan Government to eventually – and seemingly reluctantly – launch a Royal Commission into Crown Perth. His revelation was one of the bombshell news stories in Western Australia over the past year.

    In a strong field, the Channel 9 team of Kelly Haywood and Gary Adshead’s work exposing an alarming data breach deserves commendation for also challenging the Government’s message management while the work of the WAToday team of Hamish Hastie, Emma Young and Nathan Hondros highlighted and analysed the dirty detail behind the domestic gas reservation exemption for the Waitsia gas field, reinforcing the need for all reporters to scrutinise every government decision – even at the height of a pandemic.

    The judges would also like to acknowledge the work of The West Australian’s Peter Law, whose coverage of the disastrous Liberal campaign highlighted the role the Opposition’s mismanagement played in Labor’s landslide election victory – while Law set the news agenda in the crucial final moments of the State election campaign.

     

    Health/Medical Report Supported by Australian Medical Association—WA

    • Gary Adshead and Kamin Gock, WAtoday and Nine News Perth, “The Death of Aishwarya”

    Judges’ comments: The death of a seven-year-old girl at Perth’s revered children’s hospital was not just a personal tragedy — it said much about the state of WA’s public health system struggling to cope. Pandemic-aside, this was the biggest health story of the year in WA, and credit must go to this entry, which exclusively revealed the family’s devastating experience and continued to pursue the facts behind the case.

    Special mention should go to reporter Kamin Gock’s initial report. Produced under a tight deadline, it was balanced and accurate, and sparked intense media follow-up.

     

    Science and Environmental Report Supported by ABC

    • Emma Young, WAtoday, “Another plan bites the dust as WA’s best-loved bird quietly dies out”

    Judges’ comments: In a competitive category, Emma Young’s series of articles stood out for sifting through significant government spin and red tape to bring to light an important environmental issue for the Perth and Peel regions that would likely have otherwise never been reported, and highlighting the heavy cost of environment inaction in the process. Emma’s extensive research, commitment to giving a voice to all sides and dogged determination to get to the bottom of the story were also outstanding aspects of this entry.

    The judges would also like to highly commend Fiona Pepper’s entry Are We Burning in Ignorance? for its thorough, engaging and thought-provoking exploration of the challenging issue of whether WA’s prescribed burning program should be more nuanced, across three different platforms.

     

    Business, Economics or Finance Report Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Gareth Parker, WAToday.com.au and 6PR, “Chief casino officer’s ‘regular fishing trips’ with Crown Perth bosses”

    Judges’ comments: Not since the heady days of WA Inc has the relationship between a Labor Government and WA’s business elite been under such close scrutiny, with many of the entries in this year’s strong field of business and finance reports having a political edge.

    6PR breakfast presenter Gareth Parker’s coverage of Crown’s uber-comfortable relationship with State Government regulators ripped the lid off the gambling giant’s evident abuse of its privileged position in WA, potentially upending the way gaming is administered in this State. Parker made able use of his cross-platform presence to force debate and accountability of this issue and ensure pressure was applied to the Government to hold a Royal Commission into Crown Perth. As much as Parker’s exclusive reporting had political undertones, it equally exposed the smelly underbelly of the way some corporate titans go about their business. His revelation was one of the bombshell news stories in Western Australia over the past year.

    Parker’s fellow finalists in this category also deserve credit for their strong entries – Ben Harvey’s revelation of defects at Chevron’s landmark Gorgon gas project, which caused the shutdown of what remains the most expensive resources project ever developed in Australia, reverberated in markets around the globe, blindsided the WA Government and forced admissions from an embarrassed Chevron, while The Australian’s Paul Garvey’s extensive research and line-by-line scrutiny of the WA State budget papers exposing an iron ore royalties blunder that cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars.

    The judges also wish to commend John Flint’s coverage of the life and times of Sam Barnett – a reminder to us all of the importance of knowing a shifty operator when you see one, and challenging each and every claim they make.

     

    Sports Report – The Gilmour-Christian Prize Supported by Ten

    • Mitchell Woodcock, The Sunday Times, The West Australian and thewest.com.au, “West Coast Fever Salary Cap Scandal”

    Judges’ comments: In his series of exclusive articles, Mitchell has done an outstanding job shining a light on salary cap rorting within the West Coast Fever Netball Club. He has displayed tenacious investigative work in spite of clearly hitting a code of silence at the club.

    Mitchell managed to get crucial information from sources to add depth and background to his stories. We also applaud his ethics in using fair, careful and considered treatment of those unwittingly involved in the breach. Well Done and congratulations Mitchell!

     

    Social Equity Report Supported by the Equal Opportunity Commission

    • Marta Pascual Juanola, WAtoday.com.au,“‘Wrong skin’ tragedy: death, drugs and violence in a divided town”

    Judges’ comments: In an extremely well-represented category, Marta Pascual Juanola’s “Wrong Skin Tragedy” stood out for it’s beautiful storytelling, sensitivity and depth. The judges were all deeply affected by this well-researched piece, which gave a voice to the voiceless. A story that all West Australians should read.

     

    Regional and Community – Three News Stories/Features outside a 70km radius of Perth Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Briana Fiore, Harvey-Waroona Reporter, South-Western Times, Bunbury Herald and The West Australian, “Bunbury Hospital Investigation”

    Judges’ comments: Briana’s proactive efforts to highlight issues of importance to the local Filipino community eventually led her to reveal the dysfunction at Bunbury Hospital and the role the hospital’s issues had played in the death of a young mother. Her ability to break, and build on, this story was a direct result of the trust she had built with the local community and was a shining example of the power of regional journalism.

     

    New Journalist or Cadet—The Eaves-Prior-Day Prize Supported by Cannings Purple

    • Briana Fiore, Bunbury Herald, Harvey-Waroona Reporter and The West Australian, “Body of Work”

    Judges’ comments: Briana Fiore demonstrated a dedication to the craft, breaking important stories that had a profound impact on the Harvey community. Her news sense, dogged determination and concise writing stood out and in turn meant her articles made a real difference in the regional community. As the sole reporter for the local newspaper, her efforts to pursue a story for months on end whilst publishing varying other stories is a credit to her resolve and a reflection of her hard work and how capable she is as a bright young journalist.

     

    Culture and Arts Report—The A.H. Kornweibel Arts Prize Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    Judges’ comments: Mark Naglazas’s excellent three-part series provides the story behind the showbiz-style announcement of the proposed Fremantle film studio, with an authority and insight into the industry that few can bring. He explains the benefits and drawbacks of this proposal with intelligence, incisiveness, and balance.

     

     Columnist—The Matt Price Prize Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Gareth Parker, WAtoday.com.au, “WAtoday columns”

    Judges’ comments: Gareth’s columns for WAtoday on the WA state election were pertinent at the time and proved remarkably prescient following the outcome of the state election.

    Their substance was also delivered with an easy, accessibly style which made tough topics easy to understand, and a pleasure to read. He was a worthy winner.

    But also worthy of mention was The West’s Kate Emery, whose take on a post-#MeToo world were insightful and inspired, and came a very close second.

     

    Outstanding Journalism Student Award Supported by Nine

    • Amber Wilkinson, Edith Cowan University, “Body of Work”

    Judges’ comments: Amber Wilkinson displayed immense technical skill creating content that is both original, compelling and well researched. She skilfully uses the podcast medium to delve into important topics and creates an extremely engaging product that despite its length keeps the listener intrigued and informed. Her three submissions show diversity and attention to detail. Tackling such a popular medium can be challenging- but she showed skill and great promise as a journalist in our evolving industry.

     

    The Arthur Lovekin Award Supported by The University of Western Australia

          Aja Styles, “Stink from the Corpse”

    Judges’ comments: Aja places the WA higher education sector under the spotlight in her “Stink from the Corpse” series. She is one of the first journalists to consistently investigate the threats posed to academic freedom, quality education and WA’s research culture by COVID, the loss of government funding and the chronic mismanagement of the high education sector.

     

    Journalist of the Year – The Daily News Centenary Prize Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Gareth Parker

    Judges comments: The judges would like to acknowledge Gary Adshead and Kamin Gock’s coverage of Aishwarya Aswath’s death & the change that followed is to be commended. Their series laid bare our struggling hospital systems and was one of the defining stories of 2021 in Perth.

    To convince a family in grief to share their harrowing story –  and craft such powerful segments under tight deadlines is no easy task.

    The judges would also like to acknowledge Caitlin Rintoul’s work which exposed a shocking series of sex attacks within the mining industry sparked powerful change, a united effort to confront the problem from WA’s mining giants and a parliamentary inquiry. As well as Alex Mann’s “the Base Tapes”. There was an enormous risk to uncover how a global white supremacist group was infiltrating and recruiting young Australians. Alex’s tenacity to research and track down some of the recruits is to be acknowledged. His investigation is just the beginning of exposing the radicalising and threat this group poses to the nation.

    But the judges felt there was one clear winner this year – someone whose journalism is a shining example of the importance of journalists relentlessly – and fearlessly – digging, probing and challenging those in power.

    Through a bombshell news story that shone a light on conflicts of interest and cronyism, Gareth Parker exposed the lax Government supervision of WA’s only casino.

    But what stood Parker apart for the judges was how he used his cross-platform presence to then force debate, accountability – and to explain to West Australians why they should care.

     

    Outstanding Contribution to Journalism—The Clarion Award Supported by 新萄京娱乐

        Mark Bennett

    Judges’ comments: The Clarion Prize is presented to a member of the Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance who has, in the opinion of 新萄京娱乐’s Media Section Committee, made an outstanding contribution to journalism in Western Australia. The committee considers the breadth and quality of work and other ways in which the member has contributed. Tonight’s winner is an industry veteran, who has spent more than four decades telling important stories from all over WA on television, radio and online. He has been reporter, researcher, producer and newsroom chief of staff. Colleagues describe tonight’s winner as “a journo’s journo”, “an absolute genius”, “one in a million”, “gold standard”, a “legend” and a “national treasure”. But also “modest”, “humble” and a “quiet achiever”. A master of visual storytelling, he still loves the craft and the thrill of the chase. During the Esperance bushfires, our winner arranged for a mate with a plane to land on the road behind the fire so he could get up-close flame pictures.

    Our winner’s first experience in the media, many moons ago, was helping to shoot a video for a charity in South-East Asia, an experience that cemented his interest in telling the stories of people who aren’t always heard from.

    His stories don’t come from politicians or press releases, but from community groups, farmers, naturalists, truck drivers, refugees and countless others who have something compelling to say and he gives them a voice. Not posted for clicks but told out of genuine interest, care and compassion for the on-air talent and the audience. His work is driven by the belief that he’s performing a service for the community.

    Some of our winner’s best stories, which he sources, writes, shoots and edits himself, have come from the bush where his work helps to bridge the rural-city divide. The other way that tonight’s winner has made an incredibly valuable contribution to the practice of journalism is by his leadership and mentoring of up-and-comers, as you’ll hear first-hand in the video coming up.

    The 2021 Clarion goes to Mark Bennett from the ABC’s Great Southern Bureau.

  • WA Journalist of the Year Annabel Hennessy with the 新萄京娱乐 WA Media Section President Martin Turner. Photo: Sharon Smith

    PRINT/TEXT CATEGORIES

    News Coverage Supported by The West Australian

    ● Annabel Hennessy, The West Australian, “Kill or Be Killed? The incarceration of Jody Gore”

    Judges comments: “This year’s entries were of an exceptionally high standard and many would have been worthy winners in years gone by. But Annabel’s investigation into Jody Gore achieved what almost all journalists can only ever aspire to. By influencing the release of her subject from prison her efforts are a remarkable reminder of the power of public interest reporting. By tackling an undoubtedly complex and difficult subject her investigation was one that was already highly commendable. But thanks to her tenacity, in-depth research and desire she has altered the course of one woman’s life forever and sparked meaningful conversations around the lives of many other domestic violence victims — particularly in indigenous communities. Such results are arguably the pinnacle in social justice journalism — an unbelievable feat for any journalist.”

    Feature Writing – The Hugh Schmitt Prize Supported by Lavan

    ● Rhiannon Stevens, ABC Online, “Welcome to Banjawarn”

    Judges comments: “This feature, Welcome to Banjawarn, by Rhiannon Stevens was a fine example of the craft of feature writing. The writer showed initiative in exploring the improbable link between an outback station and a Japanese doomsday cult, using the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the Sarin gas attack to show the audience a fresh perspective. The storytelling lens was local rather than international, which leant itself well to showing the deep contrast between the no-nonsense outback characters and the shadowy Aum Shinrikyo group. The writer made a great effort to track down local people and investigators who had had dealings with the cult, to examine the lasting impact on the town and flesh out a compelling and well-researched narrative. The writing was spare and elegant and never fell into melodrama or sensationalism. The feature also has a classic strong anecdotal opening to hook in the audience and a changing roll call of sources and locations to keep them intrigued throughout. The result was a piece of highly original storytelling that takes the audience seamlessly from the red dirt of Banjawarn to the unfolding drama in a Tokyo subway. A standout entry deserving of the Hugh Schmitt prize.”

    Headline Journalism Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Paul Barry, The West Australian and Albany Advertiser, “No sex please, we’re Balinese”, “Worst food bar naan” and “Pulp friction”

    Judges comments: “Paul Barry pipped a tight field of exceptional entrants this year with his clever wordplay and creative humour. All three of his entries were eye-catching, compelling the reader to dive in. Two of the stories were begging for his playfulness while the third about a woodchip backlog at a port and international trade tensions, headlined “Pulp Friction”, turned a relatively dry topic into a must-read.”

    Suburban—Three Stories/Feature within a 70km radius of Perth Supported by Public Transport Authority

    ● Sarah Brookes, The Southern Gazette and The Advocate, “Body of WorkPublic housing disgrace and rehab’s hidden fees”

    ● Jake Dietsch, Mandurah Coastal Times, “Body of WorkMandurah Men’s Shed investigation and Councillor’s CCC ordeal”

    Judges comments: “Sarah: Versatile, snappily written, thoroughly researched and topics in tune with community concerns. Jake: Investigated well, asked questions, got usual bureaucratic semi-response and they trigger real action. Great work!”

    PHOTOGRAPHY CATEGORIES

    Community/Regional Photography Supported by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet

    ● Andrew Ritchie, Western Suburbs Weekly, “Body of Work”

    Judges comments: “The judges agreed that Andrew Ritchies combination of creativity and technical proficiency created work that was unique and engaging. Andrew’s image of Kay Lane OAM showed originality and a fresh approach to portraiture, while his other entries both showed an ability to push his photography to create bold and dynamic images which tell stories and pull the viewing into his world.”

    News Photograph Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Colin Murty, The Australian, “Wuhan evacuees”

    Judges comments: “News photography has the unique challenge of blending technical proficiency, creativity and  eye for story telling to create impactful images from a spontaneous moment. Colin’s images cover all of these aspects to tell the story of Wuhan evacuees as they are quarantined on Christmas Island. The judges agreed it was great work under difficult conditions.”

    Feature Photograph/Photographic Essay Supported by Media Super

    ● Ross Swanborough, The West Australian and The Sunday Times, “Strength in numbers call for a change”

    Judges comments: “The series of images in Ross Swanborough’s Feature/Photo Essay entry beautifully capture one of the most emotionally charged, important events of the year. Creative and insightful, the series of photographs in ‘Strength in numbers call for change’ has great impact in showing the strength of feeling as thousands of people marched in Perth’s historic Black Lives Matter protest. More than just topical – these pictures reflect the micro and the macro – as they highlight the ongoing fight against racism at home, the campaign to end Indigenous deaths in custody and the world-wide movement sparked by the death of George Floyd.”

    TELEVISION/AUDIO-VISUAL JOURNALISM

    News Story or Feature Supported by Seven Network

    Flashpoint, Seven, “Flashpoint: Height of the pandemic”

    Judges comments: “Flashpoint provided a remarkable insight into, and valuable record of, the impact the Covid-19 shutdown had on a range of West Australians at a time when we were scrambling to understand the unprecedented changes taking place. The production qualities and reporting are world class and the stories chosen by the team provided a humbling we-are-all-in-this-together, behind-the-scenes look at what was happening around us. We discovered how nurses felt being separated from their families, how a household name – Bret from Kath and Kim – managed to smile through the loss of  his future income and then turn to truck driving to look after his family, and the Premier allowed us into some of the urgent hourly meetings he was involved in.”

    RADIO/AUDIO JOURNALISM

    News Story or Feature Supported by Media Super

    ● Erin Parke, Background Briefing, ABC News – AM program Radio National, ABC online and ABC podcast, “Outback Born Again”

    Judges comments: “Erin Parke succeeds in highlighting unusual, potential alarming, religious practices in Aboriginal communities in The Kimberley. The series required extensive contact building, trust, and a strong ethical focus. It was expertly delivered and impacted a wide audience. The Judges also acknowledge the excellent, extensive work undertaken by The West in producing the Claremont Serial Killer trial podcast.”

    MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM

    Multimedia Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Hamish Hastie and Hannah Barry, WAtoday, “Blood, sweat and burgers: the business so dodgy it made Grill’d look good”

    Judges comments: “The beauty of this series of stories is that Hamish Hastie and Hannah Barry used new media as the platform for a significant piece of journalism that was put together using old-fashioned journalistic techniques. The considerable grunt work involved in trawling court documents, carrying out company searches, building a dossier on the activities of the business and its owner, and convincing victims to go on the record is not to be underestimated, but the stories were then told in a modern and easily accessible way. Most importantly, they caused a reaction from Fair Work Australia.”

    ALL MEDIA (including online publications)

    Freelance Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Kristin Shorten, PLAY magazine, thewest.com.au, The West Australian and The Weekend West, “The Boy in the Blue Cap: The Gerard Ross Story”

    Judges comments: “High impact journalism. The hook of a re-investigation into the Ross mystery wasn’t new, but the effort in telling the story and exploring new angles was top shelf. Combining the newspaper stories with the online video doubled the power of the series. The Ross murder was a painfully sad story and this effort to help police get a breakthrough was invaluable.”

    Camerawork Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Carl Nelson, Ten News First, “Christmas Island Montage – a body of work”

    Judges comments: “Carl’s creativity, forward-thinking and breadth of coverage while capturing the COVID crisis on Christmas Island is an asset to WA’s media industry. Carl produced outstanding video and audio in challenging conditions, including an exclusive story on the high seas and packed his macro lens to capture the island’s crab migration.”

    Political Report – The Beck Prize Supported by The Sunday Times

    ● Joe Spagnolo, The Sunday Times, “McGowan versus Palmer versus Morrison”

    Judges comments: “Western Australia’s experience of COVID-19 has varied vastly to that of other states and Joe Spagnolo showcased the tension between WA and the rest of the nation in his two pieces for the Sunday Times newspaper. Spagnolo used his contacts to gain exclusive interviews with the Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison who urged WA to set a date to reopen its borders. The situation escalated when businessman Clive Palmer imitated a legal challenge in the High Court to the border closure and Spagnolo revealed the Commonwealth had joined Palmer in the challenge, placing further pressure on WA Premier Mark McGowan’s border decision. The judges noted the newsworthiness, impact and public benefit of these articles in making their decision.”

    Health/Medical Report Supported by Australian Medical Association—WA

    ● Syan Dougherty, 7 News, “Humanity, not statistics”

    Judges comments: “The heartbreak of someone being unable to spend time with a dying loved one was laid bare in Syan’s story. For many West Australians, the experience of COVID-19 has been far removed and based on news reports about people they don’t know. But the daughter in this story cried real tears and provided an insight into the raw emotion families face when this cruel virus takes the life of a loved one. The story highlighted the difficult clinical decisions that are sometimes made in life and death situations, putting a human face to a pandemic with which the world is still grappling. The judges would also like to commend Kirsti Melville for her beautifully crafted story explaining the daily challenges facing people with cystic fibrosis. Her story showed great empathy and offered hope for a devastating condition which once robbed people of their lives by their early 20s.”

    Science and Environmental Report Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Claire Moodie, ABC News Online, “Battle for the Fitzroy”

    Judges’ comments: “In a strong and diverse category the judges felt the scope and depth of Claire Moodie’s series on the Fitzroy was an outstanding example of journalistic excellence in a remote area with little support. Demonstrating rich story-telling craft aligned to perseverance and public interest, this is a deserving winner.”

    Business, Economics or Finance Report Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Hamish Hastie and Hannah Barry, WAtoday, “Blood, sweat and burgers: the business so dodgy it made Grill’d look good”

    Judges comments: “Hastie and Barry provided a well-researched insight into allegations of phoenix activity, underpayment of staff, breaches of health codes and unethical behaviour across The Local Shack chain of burger restaurants. Basing their stories on court documents and accounts from former employees amid significant pressure including legal threats from The Local Shack’s backers, Hastie and Barry doggedly pieced together a compelling narrative of persistently poor and inappropriate workplace practices. Their series of stories, topical amid a flurry of revelations across Australia of other businesses underpaying and neglecting their staff, had a significant impact in Western Australia because it gave a much-needed voice to hard-done-by ex-employees and prompted the Fair Work Commission and the Tax Office to renew their interest in The Local Shack.”

    Sports Report – The Gilmour-Christian Prize Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Glen Quartermain, The West Australian, “Footy Icon Concussion Bombshell”

    Judges comments: “Glen’s story was clearly the standout sport story of the year, and could prove to be one of the most significant football stories for many years. Trusted by Graham Farmer’s family to reveal the great ruckman’s chronic traumatic encephalopathy diagnosis, Glen treated the story with compassion and empathy, while still sending shockwaves through football administrators across Australia, and overseas. A unanimous winner.”

    Social Equity Report Supported by the Equal Opportunity Commission

    ● Annabel Hennessy, The West Australian, “Kill or Be Killed? The incarceration of Jody Gore”

    Judges comments: “This was an outstanding series of articles, which laid bare a part of WA’s legal system which failed to take into account victims of domestic violence and the way it affects women who are part of these relationships. The case study of Jodie Gore was shocking and the details the journalist was able to obtain, and the way the story was told, was sensitive to the mental health issues involved, but also laid out the essential facts. The case file note from the shelter was an incredible find, and added to the case, as did speaking with the victim when she was released. The story of Jody Gore stays with you long after you finish reading.”

    Regional and Community – Three News Stories/Features outside a 70km radius of Perth Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Mark Bennett, ABC TV News WA and ABC News 24, “Stories of people and their lives in small regional communities”

    Judges comments: “With style and humanity,  Mark Bennett brought to life aspects of south-west life. His Noralup yarn conveyed how prison wardens and inmates can help make communities better places, the COVID report conveyed the aspirations of migrants who just want to work and the fires piece showed the dedication of the people who protect our communities. Each piece was an outstanding news feature.”

    New Journalist or Cadet—The Eaves-Prior-Day Prize Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Kamin Gock, Nine News Perth and The Today Show, “My First Year of Work”

    Judges comments: “Kamin Gock’s work showed exceptional news sense and an ability to look beyond the obvious to tackle complex issues with balance and tenacity underpinned by solid research. He used impressive initiative to follow leads and develop trust which resulted in strong stories with a high level of public interest.”

    Culture and Arts Report—The A.H. Kornweibel Arts Prize Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Rhiannon Stevens, ABC Radio National Earshot, “The Legacy of Lucky Dube”

    Judges comments: “This documentary seamlessly mixes hard to find music, archival research and first person stories, taking audiences across the most remote parts of WA and NT to introduce them to a little known but highly influential character – Lucky Dube. Rhiannon built trusting relationships with people who could provide context for this story, researched a very niche part of musical history through archives, and then crafted a compelling and entertaining narrative . The result is the first exhaustive, publicly-available historical record of Lucky Dube’s tour of central Australia. An important moment in Australian musical history that until this point had not been covered in such depth.”

    Columnist—The Matt Price Prize Supported by The West Australian

    ● Ryan Daniels, The West Australian and thewest.com.au, “Body of work”

    Judges comments: “In sporting parlance, Ryan’s first year as a print columnist in The West Australian has immediately marked him as a rising star of the medium. His columns provided meaningful insight and much-needed humour in a footballing year like no other, and were all the more meritorious given they were produced along with his many and varied broadcasting commitments. A worthy winner.”

    Outstanding Journalism Student Award Supported by Nine

    ● Keane Bourke,Curtin University, “Body of Work”

    Judges comments: “Keane Bourke produced an outstanding body of work that demonstrated valuable journalistic competencies. He harnessed a variety of story-telling techniques and devices. His work showed an ability to achieve depth in his reporting, perform under pressure, seize story opportunities, cover a wide breadth of topics, and patience in developing a story idea.”

    The Arthur Lovekin Award Supported by The University of Western Australia

    ● Annabel Hennessy, The West Australian, “Kill or Be Killed? The incarceration of Jody Gore”

    Journalist of the Year – The Daily News Centenary Prize Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    ● Annabel Hennessy

    Judges’ comments: “Powerful campaigning journalism that righted a wrong and shone a light on the darkest side of domestic violence. Through Annabel’s story real and meaningful change has now been made.”

  • Winners at the 2019 WA Media Awards. Photo: Sharon Smith
    PRINT/TEXT CATEGORIES:

    News Coverage Supported by The West Australian

    • John Flint, The Sunday Times newspaper and thewest.com.au, “Deep Trouble”

    “Deep Trouble” demonstrated a reporter’s determination to ‘own’ a story about an issue that may not have otherwise received much air beyond the initial breaking news of the accident. At a time workplace safety is increasingly under scrutiny, John Flint’s body of work showed employers can not hide from their obligations – even so far under water. The reporter clearly persevered to win the trust of traumatised and injured workers, putting a face to the diving calamity and revealing its long-lasting impacts for the community. The stories involved careful research into technical aspects of deep sea diving, and the judges considered them to be of great public benefit.

    Feature WritingThe Hugh Schmitt Prize Supported by Lavan

    • Kirsti Melville, ABC Online and Earshot, ABC Radio National, “The Ghosts of Wittenoom”

    This was a well-crafted and assured feature, illuminating the indigenous perspective on an environmental and human tragedy. The writer canvassed a wide range of sources and it was rigorously researched. The writing is crisp but not melodramatic and uses a range of narrative techniques to good effect. It broke the news that the Banjima people are considering legal action against the WA government for failing to provide safe access to their native title land. It prompted ongoing media coverage, and renewed negotiations between government and traditional owners. The Banjima people still swim and fish in Wittenoom Gorge, despite the risk. It’s one of the few places within their native title determination that’s accessible. The Pilbara’s Aboriginal people also worked the most dangerous jobs at Wittenoom – bagging asbestos, loading the trucks and hitching rides on them, breathing in asbestos dust. They have the highest mortality rate from mesothelioma of any group, anywhere in the world.

    Headline Journalism Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • The West Australian backbench, The West Australian, “Fake Ewes”, “Sell Sell Cell” and “Calf Wit”

    The ability of The West’s backbench to deliver witty headlines with brevity was evident in its entries and it’s consistency was what secured a unanimous win with the judges. With few words to play with, the trio of headlines embodied tabloid journalism at its best. Succinct, pun-laden headlines that need no explanation, yet leave you wanting more.

    Suburban—Three Stories/Features within a 70km radius of Perth Supported by Public Transport Authority

    • Sarah Brookes, Community News – The Advocate, “Shalom House investigation”

    Sarah Brookes’ investigation into the ‘tough love’ drug rehab Shalom House displayed tenacity, curiosity and the willingness to overcome fierce opposition to tell a story. Sarah’s detailed examination of the true success rates behind the facility’s bold claims and her interviews with participants and family members shed new light on a story that has received a great deal of positive coverage. Her stories were well researched and exposed the untold story behind the spin, to the benefit of her local community.

    PHOTOGRAPHY CATEGORIES:

    Community/Regional Photography Supported by Department of the Premier and Cabinet

    • Kelsey Reid, Kalgoorlie Miner and The West Australian, “Goldfields Unites”, “Outback Beauty” and “A Golden Find”

    Kelsey’s entry demonstrated her skill and versatility as a photographer. All three images showed a strong connection to her community. Two of the photos were highly newsworthy while the third, “Outback Beauty”, was a high-end fashion image, shot in a distinctive, textural Goldfields landscape. Kelsey has a talent for capturing authentic emotion in her photos – whether it be the jubilation of a gold discovery, or the poignancy of a community united in grief.

    News Photograph Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Ross Swanborough, Perthnow, “Hear me”

    Ross Swanborough has captured a strong news image. The photograph is powerful in its simplicity – a small aboriginal woman standing up to a large white male. Like all good news photography, the image as not set up, but photographed off the cuff as the story unfolded in front of the photographer.

    Feature Photograph/Photographic Essay Supported by Media Super

    • Danella Bevis, The West Australian, “Kimberley women and the power of a football”

    Danella Bevis’s  images are very powerful, combining her skill as a photographer with dynamic storytelling. The photographer herself says something magical is taking place in WA’s central Kimberley, and this is especially reflected in the lighting and movement captured in both ‘Handball’ and ‘Smoking’. These images are aesthetically stunning, but more importantly reflect the players’ devotional passion for both footy and community. This series beautifully captures the hope and purpose of women in a remote indigenous community coming together for better outcomes.

    TELEVISION/AUDIO-VISUAL JOURNALISM:

    News Story or Feature Supported by Seven Network

    • Anne-Maree Leonard, 9 News 6pm bulletin,“Exposing Salini”

    Journalism that builds and keeps trust with sources to hold power to account is at the very foundation of our democracy. This story revealed tunnel workers’ lives were at risk. Anne-Maree’s reporting led to increased pressure on the company to improve safety standards and relied on brave workers to blow the whistle on their employer’s dodgy practices.

    RADIO/AUDIO JOURNALISM:

    News Story or Feature Supported by Media Super

    • Kirsti Melville, Earshot, ABC Radio National, “The Ghosts of Wittenoom”

    ‘The Ghosts of Wittenoom’ delved into the devastation of asbestosis for the Aboriginal community of the Pilbara. The continual exposure of asbestos to the community is startling. Kirsti Melville’s reporting highlights the inadequacy of the care for the community’s health and the lack of action to tackle and clean up the issue to create a safe environment for the people living there. ‘The Ghosts of Wittenoom’ is as emotive piece with powerful interviews and devastating details of the health impacts for the Aboriginal community.

    MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM:

    Multimedia Supported by The Australian

    • Emma Young and Hamish Hastie, WAtoday, “Perth’s tangled web: Property, power and the people who pull the strings”

    Emma Young and Hamish Hastie may have used old-fashioned journalism to assemble the nuts and bolts of their Tangled Web series, which painted a convoluted picture of the connections between those who control almost every facet of Perth’s property world, but there was nothing old fashioned about the presentation. They made use of impressive data visualisation maps to show just how connected the players are and accompany a compelling piece of journalism on a subject that affects so many West Australians.

    ALL MEDIA (including online publications):

    Freelance Journalist Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Kristin Shorten, thewest.com.au, “Father Joe: Saint or Sinner?”

    Kristen Shorten’s series on Father Joe was top-class. She went behind  the headlines of a suspected paedophile priest to bring us the full  back-story of how his alleged crimes and death affected his large community. Kristen showed persistence and built up trust to the point where she could tell a story that gripped readers.

    Camerawork Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Andrew Seabourne, 7pm News ABC WA and 7.30 ABC, “Kimberley Queen”, “Norforce Recruits” and “Fitzroy Bones”

    The judges were impressed with the quality and variety of the cameraman’s work.. his carefully thought out shots, some taken over days, were crucial to telling the stories. His use of light, tracking shots and sequences made for stunning packages that captured the beauty of the region… while his lense gave viewers a genuine insight in to the talent and subjects being reported on, and it was all done with respect and careful consideration to those people and communities.

    Political Report – The Beck Prize Supported by Sunday Times

    • Nick Butterly, The West Australian, “Mike Drop”

    Nick Butterly’s scoop was the trigger for an earlier end to Mike Nahan’s leadership than the party wanted. Butterly had exposed secret internal discussions about the timing of Nahan’s resignation and it was spot on. Desperate party figures and MPs tried to label Butterly’s story “fake news”. One MP even suggested the only part of the paper to be trusted was the price on the front cover. Less than 24 hours later that MP was apologising and Nahan was gone. Plenty of Liberals were eating humble pie. Butterly’s story was proof that the power of print can still trump the spin of politics.

    Health/Medical Report Supported by Australian Medical Association—WA

    • John Flint, The Sunday Times, perthnow.com.au and thewest.com.au, “Truth Flushed Out”

    John Flint got his hands dirty – or should we say wet? – in his  determination to check how safe the water was at a flagship  public facility. The reporter was brushed off by authorities, stalled – but didn’t give up in his quest. John’s reports are a textbook example of good journalism being about disclosure.

    Science And Environmental Report Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • John Flint, The Sunday Times, perthnow.com.au and thewest.com.au, “Truth Flushed Out”

    John Flint’s ‘Truth Flushed Out’ presents as conformation of what many in the wider community believe. Public officials are deceptive and unwilling to confront uncomfortable issues. Their attempts to discredit are methodically debunked by Flint who never loses sight of the central theme. The article represents exceptional investigative journalism in the public interest.

    Business, Economics or Finance Report Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Sean Smith and Neale Prior , The Sunday Times and The West Australian, “Sterling farce”

    This series of articles stood out for the depth of analysis of a major financial scandal that has affected dozens of Western Australians. The reporting combined detailed financial insights with the personal stories of people affected by the collapse. It also highlighted the failings of the corporate regulator.

    Sports Report – The Gilmour-Christian Prize Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Rory Campbell, 7 News, “Heroic Mother”

    This was a great get by Rory Campbell; well researched and produced with evidence of admirable persistence and the ability to cultivate connections in the pursuit of a genuinely exclusive story that delivered a powerful yet poignant message.

    Social Equity Report Supported by Equal Opportunity Commission

    • Emily Jane Smith, ABC online, ABC Kimberley Facebook and ABC PM, “’Not another nameless statistic’: Kimberley family speaks out after teen takes her own life”

    Incredible access and outstanding use of limited time and resources to tell a very sensitive and normally inaccessible story. Empathetic, respectful reporting that engages First Nations voices on a subject newsrooms find difficult to approach and almost impossible to access. Emily Jane Smith’s coverage of this issue shows a commitment to the region’s community and the issues that dominate their lives. That Ms Hall’s family allowed Smith such intimate access to Ms Hall’s funeral and granted interviews to Smith is a sign of their trust in her process and integrity. An outstanding piece of work.

    Regional and Community –Three News Stories/Features outside a 70km radius of Perth Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • ABC Esperance, Landline, ABC News online and AM, “The 2015 Esperance bushfire inquest”

    The Esperance community felt let down by the bureaucracy when catastrophic fires engulfed the town but the ABC crew were determined to stand by the community in their time of need. They evoked the trauma suffered, the resilience shown and the lessons learnt in the inquest into the event, providing thorough and sensitive coverage. The quality of all entries in this category is testament to the passion and commitment of reporters throughout WA to tell local stories fundamental to their communities and share them with a wider audience. We are all the better for their reporting.

    New Journalist or Cadet—The Eaves-Prior-Day Prize Supported by Cannings Purple

    • Jon Daly, ABC The World Today, ABC News Channel, ABC 7PM News, Country Hour and ABC local radio, “China struggles to contain African swine fever, resorts to mass live-pig burials, millions of culls”, “Destocking and desalination underway in WA as autumn breeding begins amid water crisis” and “With an almost $7 billion crop, history shines on WA’s most valuable and second largest harvest”

    Jon Daly is an exceptionally talented young journalist whose body of work shows an incredible amount of news sense, research and composition skill to make rural topics palatable to a mainstream audience. His news feature on the extent and effects of the African swine fever skilfully tackles an issue not only significant to domestic agriculture but important to a global audience.

    Outstanding Journalism Student Award Supported by Nine

    • Samantha Goerling, Edith Cowan Universitys, “More than half young Australians say they have been the subject of cyber bullying”, “Silent Danger: Journalists and Psychological Trauma” and “Apps, Gaps and Mental Health Services”

    Samantha Goerling’s work shows exceptional storytelling ability. She skilfully interweaves audio grabs into her narration to provide a compelling and balanced view of sensitive issues. Her three pieces dealt with mental health topics – cyberbullying, work-related PTSD and treatment apps – and they showed a mature understanding of the issues and the sector trying to manage them.

    Culture and Arts Report—The A.H. Kornweibel Arts Prize Supported by Serafino Wines

    • Erin Parke, ABC News, 7.30 and ABC, “White Bones in a Dark History”

    Stories about repatriation and Indigenous culture are challenging to tell for a mainstream audience. However this piece demonstrates cultural sensitivity, dedication and creativity. Erin Parke’s powerful storytelling has brought about greater awareness of a dark part of Australian history and has also created tangible change for the Yawuru and Karajarri communities today.

    Columnist—The Matt Price Prize Supported by The West Australian

    • Gareth Parker, The Sunday Times, “Ore Struck: sifting through the train wreck of BHP’s royalty payments”, “This is going to hurt… a lot” and “A fat lot of good”

    Gareth Parker’s body of work clearly reflects the supporting statement, “… lively and interesting opinion writing in strong, well-sourced, revealing reporting with ample context.” The columns express well-crafted, solid analysis and opinion without seeking to lecture the reader; very much in the Matt Price style.

    The Arthur Lovekin Award Supported by The University of Western Australia

    • Nathan Hondros, WAtoday, “Sleepers Wake: Uncovering China’s WA War of Influence”

    Nathan Hondros, ‘Sleepers Wake: Uncovering China’s WA War of Influence’, WAtoday. A series of investigative articles raising concern over foreign influence at the international, federal and state level. A detailed and tenacious examination of a complex network of people and organisations, asking at times uncomfortable questions over the relationship between state, political and corporate interests, and the need for transparency in business and diplomacy.

    Outstanding Contribution to Journalism-The Clarion Award 2019 Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Simon Hydzik, 7 NEWS Australia

    This 2019 Clarion goes to one of a group of media professionals whose skills and achievements are not publicly acknowledged as often as they might be – those behind the camera, who put themselves on the line on a daily basis to bring us the images that make stories come to life. Simon Hydzik was just 17 when in 2001 he knocked on the doors of the Perth community TV station, then known as Access 31, wanting to do something – anything – to learn. In January this year, when supporters of a kangaroo killer attacked members of the media, Simon kept filming. His lens was smashed, and the man who smashed it remarked as he was dragged away, “He’s smiling at me.” That was quite possibly true. He’s that of kind of guy. He lives for the job and is always at his best  – and feeling his best  – when he’s in the thick of it. Whether he’s covering street protests in Hong Kong, earthquakes and tsunamis in Indonesia, or suburban crime and grime in Perth, Simon is one of the cammos every reporter wants by their side. He has contacts that would be the envy of any journalist but he also has an uncanny ability to find the centre of the action on a breaking news story, and get there before anyone else. In every way, he sets the bar high. He’s frequently there to capture arrests at the end of manhunts and police chases. He will often go out alone after hours, if something is breaking. There’s no bragging, no grandstanding, just an email saying the vision is back on station and he’s on to the next yarn.

    West Australian Journalist of the Year – The Daily News Centenary Prize 2019 Supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Kristin Shorten, thewest.com.au

    There was lengthy discussion and debate between the three judges when deliberating Kristin Shorten’s entry, Father Joe: Sinner or Saint. Reporting suicide is always difficult, but constructing a four part series that centres on one man’s suicide is fraught with complexity. However, this controversial story provided a compelling insight into a largely closed community as it grappled with the death of a dominant figure.


  • Winners of the 2018 WA Media Awards. Photo: Sachi Kotecha
    The winners of the 2018 WA Media Awards were announced at the WA Media Ball in Perth on October 27, 2018.

    This year’s media awards attracted more than 280 entries and the judges said the standard of journalism entered for the awards was outstanding.

    Gary Adshead of The West Australian was named the West Australian Journalist of the Year for his work exposing a series of misrepresentations by the former State MP for Darling Range Barry Urban about his past. The judges said this was “the sort of journalism all of us in the media should be striving to achieve”. The judges acknowledged an extremely high standard of work across all the winners of each category, but Gary’s work was “a level above the rest”.

    The Clarion Prize for the Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism went to Cathy O’Leary who began her career in 1984 on a Perth suburban newspaper. In 1985, she was offered a job at The West Australian and very early on began to specialise in health reporting. The judges said: “In an industry that might sometimes be distracted by social media stats and ‘clickbait’, she continues to remind colleagues what the important issues are. Her multi-award-winning reporting has led to major changes, at state and national levels, within the health system and public health policy, in a wide range of areas… changes that will have a positive impact on the health of generations to come.”

    The Arthur Lovekin Prize for Excellence in Journalism was awarded to Tony Barrass of The Sunday Times for his story ‘McCusker’s Bid to Clear Child Killer’. The judges were impressed by Tony’s meticulous, almost forensic, research into a potentially significant miscarriage of justice. “The well-crafted narrative keeps public attention on police and judicial processes, which remain an important issue in WA,” they said.

    新萄京娱乐 congratulates all of the 2018 WA Media Awards winners. Martin Turner, WA 新萄京娱乐 Media section president said: “It is pleasing to see such a strong commitment to excellence in journalism as has been shown in the entry level to this year’s WA Media Awards. It is equally pleasing to enjoy an evening with our media friends from across the industry to celebrate our work, and to demonstrate the enjoyment we get from such a noble and intellectually stimulating environment as the media affords us. Thanks in particular to our generous sponsors for supporting quality journalism and our judges for sharing their professional knowledge to determine winners,” Turner said.

    Outstanding Journalism Student Award

    Sponsor: Department of Premier and Cabinet

    Winner:

    • Stephanie Baumgartel, Edith Cowan University: Body of work

    Finalists

    • Elisha Hammond, Edith Cowan University: Body of work
    • Liz Sheehan, Edith Cowan University: Body of work

    Judges’ Comments This category shows the great work being done in universities to develop new journalists and the future is in good hands if these stories are an indication. Many of the stories had been picked up in mainstream media and Stephanie Baumgartel’s was among those, shining a light on Rottnest’s dirty underwater pollution secrets. Her work across her stories reflected the ability to find a fresh angle, research and report with flair and it will be worth watching to see what she tackles next.

    New Journalist or Cadet – The Eaves-Prior-Day Prize

    Sponsor: Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

    Winner:

    • James Carmody, ABC: Body of work

    Finalists:

    • Hannah Barry, Fairfax Media: From Kalgoorlie to Parliament House: My first year foray into journalism
    • Grace Jones, The Great Southern Weekender: Lisa Blair returns to Oz

    Judges’ Comments The judges had a great range of work from new journos across the state and there’s a lot of talent among this cohort, that’s for sure. James Carmody stood out among them for his versatility. He reported across radio, television and online news where he’s also proficient with a camera. James showed a great range of research in his Cyclone Kevin reporting, was among the media throng reporting on the Margaret River murders and stood his ground at the scene of a mass drug overdose in the face of a hostile hostel owner. He’s shown himself to be developing into a very good all-rounder.

    News Photograph

    Sponsor: The Sunday Times

    Winner:

    • Danella Bevis, The West Australian: ‘Rescued’

    Finalists:

    • Liam Ducey, Echo News: Local government bloodbath
    • Meggie Morris, ABC: Whale stranding

    Judges’ Comments: ‘Rescued’ – An image with great news value, showing good technical skills … and made from a distance in very challenging questionable light. Not only does the bear and the boy tell a great story – but the faces of the three men looking on add to the drama … fabulous.

    Community/Regional Photography

    Sponsor: Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

    Winner:

    • Jon Gellweiler, South Western Times: Body of work

    Finalists:

    • Liam Ducey, Echo News: Local government bloodbath
    • Tex Reeks, Mandurah Mail: Shot in the dark: Mandurah after hours

    Judges’ Comments: Jon Gellweiler’s Body of Work is a step above the pack in terms of technical skills. His work shows a good range of subject matter, and the images tell great stories.

    Feature Photographic Essay

    Sponsor: Media Super

    Winner:

    • David Dare Parker, Freelance: ‘Exodus: Rohingya refugee crisis’

    Finalists:

    • Colin Murty, The Australian: ‘Songlines’
    • Hugh Sando, ABC: Dr David Goodall

    Judges’ Comments: David Dare Parker’s ‘Rohingya refugees’ is a standout above all others. David’s work amongst the Rohingya fleeing Myanmar is very much world class. A telling visual portrayal of the suffering of the Rohingya … and the aftermath of apparent attempted genocide.

    Broadcast Camerawork – All Media Sponsor Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance Winner Gareth White, Channel 9 Perth: Missing woman found Finalists

    • Alexandru Ionita, Network Ten: Wellington Square Brawl
    • Simon Hydzik, Seven West Media: Police ROG Unit and wild parties

    Highly Commended Simon Hydzik, Seven West Media: Police ROG Unit and wild parties Judges’ Comments When news unfolds in front of you, there is an ethical decision in terms of how much to become a participant rather than the storyteller. The judges praised Gareth White for navigating this challenge with professionalism, while under pressure to get the story. While it was clear that the first concern was for the welfare of the missing woman, he secured an exclusive, attention-grabbing interview as they drove her to waiting emergency services.

    Best Three News Stories or Features – Community/Regional – All Media

    Sponsor: Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance

    Winner: Sam Tomlin, ABC Kimberley: Body of work

    Finalists

    • Peter de Kruijff, The Kimberley Echo: Reports from the Kimberley
    • Carla Hildebrandt, Fairfax Media: Captain Crook exposed
    • Chris Thomson, The Great Southern Weekender: Albany shopping hours debate

    Judges’ Comments Sam Tomlin produced consistently well-written and researched stories on key local issues in the turbulent Goldfields. The contribution of indigenous rangers to keeping the peace during the Elijah trial was nicely observed. Measured coverage was credited with helping during a tense time in Kalgoorlie. A gold miner dudding workers and vice versa would be water-cooler moments around town. Observation and the working of contacts are the bread and butter of reporting, keeping the journalist at the cutting edge of the local news beat.

    Freelance Journalist – All Media

    Sponsor: Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

    Winner: Tom de Souza, Freelance: Body of work

    Finalists

    • Carmelo Amalfi, Freo StreetWise: Body of work
    • Brendan Foster, Freelance: Body of work

    Judges’ Comments Tom de Souza’s compelling personal tale of a descent into drug addiction, and of the hard road to recovery, takes us to the heart of a problem wrecking lives and relationships across the State. Adding value to the story in a foreign setting – Indonesia – demonstrated ingenuity and resourcefulness across genre and context. Tom’s other story on the Yiriman Project in Western Australia’s Kimberley shed light on another intractable problem; indigenous alienation and suicide. Tom put a positive spin on an often elusive issue, enlisting the community’s assistance to tell the tale.

    Culture and Arts Report – The A.H. Kornweibel Prize – All Media

    Sponsor: Serafino Wines

    Winner: Katie McDonald, Business News: Strategic plan to build on creative connections

    Finalists

    • Victoria Laurie, The Australian: What’s up with the arts in this state?
    • Damian Smith, ABC Radio Perth: Jump Climb goes under, owing Fringe artists thousands

    Judges’ Comments This is a very well-researched suite of stories covering a diverse and complex sector in a detailed manner. The stories explore both the challenges and opportunities for arts and culture in WA through multiple interviews, context and background. Importantly, they collectively point to the future of the sector in terms of funding issues and engagement with other industries such as tourism. Though complex, the stories are engaging, well-structured and have significant news value. Health/Medical Report – All Media Sponsor AMA WA Winner Claire Moodie and Team, ABC: Mesh victims fight back Finalists

    • John Flint, The Sunday Times: Flushing nonsense
    • Victoria Laurie, The Australian: Life and soul

    Judges’ Comments Judging of the Health/Medical category was exhausting. So many heart-breaking stories. All the judges commented on the high standard of entries and the difficulty of choosing from so many very moving, well told and tragic stories. “Never again doing this category” said one of them. Claire Moodie’s story for ABC 7.30 stood out. Claire skillfully and sensitively told the story of one of Australia’s biggest health scandals – that women across the country have been living in severe pain since being fitted with pelvic mesh implants to treat prolapse and incontinence. These women’s suffering has been ignored for too long. The story came to life with the excellent use of numerous case studies that described the problem in an engaging and honest way. This was enhanced by superb production. The story was also balanced and alternative views were respected and given appropriate airtime. The follow-up online story showed the extraordinary and expensive measures some women have taken to deal with the problem. Moving, heartbreaking and well told.

    Science and Environmental Report – All Media

    Sponsor: Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

    Winner: Kathryn Diss, ABC News: How the Gorgon gas plant could wipe out a year of solar emissions savings

    Finalists

    • John Flint, The Sunday Times: A toxic stain
    • Erin Parke, ABC News: Animal smuggling

    Judges’ Comments John Flint and Erin Parke each produced outstanding pieces of work and are commended by the judges. Kathryn Diss spent several months researching the Gorgon gas plant’s failure to meet its key environmental condition of capturing and storing carbon dioxide underground. Kathryn broke down a complex issue by using a consumer angle to tell the story. The finished product featured on ABC TV News and on the ABC website and was well executed, using on-screen graphs in the TV report and easily understood charts in the online version. Her research also questioned Australia’s ability (or inability) to meet its global climate change agreement and a lack of political will to introduce unpopular policies to meet the target.

    Social Equity Report – All Media

    Sponsor: Equal Opportunity Commission

    Winner: Gabrielle Jeffery, Community News : ‘Til death do us part

    Finalists

    • Kirsti Melville, ABC Radio National: A Wicked problem
    • Damian Smith, ABC Radio Perth: Myer accused of racial profiling
    • Joe Spagnolo, The Sunday Times: The fight for marriage equality: Dean Smith’s Bill

    Judges’ Comments Social equity involves the protection and proper treatment of the most vulnerable in our society. This was a story about a woman who was so close to death that she was unconscious when a celebrant performed a marriage ceremony that outraged the woman’s family, turned them against the groom/fiancé and ultimately saw the celebrant censured. This story is remarkable in the way that it brings all perspectives into the story with great sensitivity. This is community news reporting at its best. It goes to an issue of the exploitation and protection of the vulnerable. This story came to Jeffery after a tip-off from witnesses. She had to provide them with assurances that their identities would not be disclosed. She used the court processes to dig out the transcript. There was research all the way through, getting to an understanding of the Marriage Act and following up on the status of the celebrant. Every possible angle was included, giving all parties concerned the opportunity to tell their side. In addition, the story was picked up by other media nationally and internationally.

    Business, Economics or Finance Report – All Media

    Sponsor: The Australian

    Winner: Matthew Mckenzie, Business News: Technology drives reform need in energy

    Finalists

    • Kathryn Diss, ABC News: How a single oil and gas plant could wipe out a year of solar emissions savings
    • Paul Garvey, The Australian: Pilbara turf war: No room for minnows

    Judges’ Comments Mckenzie’s three-part submission devoted valuable column inches to a very important topic for the business community – affordable and sustainable energy. His stories provided a rare long-form insight into electricity market contestability and the improved viability of battery power storage. Mckenzie was thorough and covered all bases, including relevant graphics and explaining the facts and figures pertaining to the changing face of WA’s energy market, and clearly spelt out the need for more reform.

    Political Report – The Beck Prize – All Media

    Sponsor: The Sunday Times

    Winner: Gary Adshead, The West Australian: Urban disaster

    Finalists

    • Nathan Hondros, Fairfax Media: Darling Range by-election coverage
    • Victoria Laurie and Paige Taylor, The Weekend Australian: John Cameron, the man who set off a domino effect

    Judges’ Comments Reporters expect politicians to tell a few porkies. But who would ever believe that one of our elected representatives might make up the better part of an entire career? Armed with a small piece of information, The West Australian’s Gary Adshead began making inquiries about a police service medal worn at an ANZAC Day ceremony by Labor MP Barry Urban. A senior staffer in the Premier’s office called Gary to tell him he had been given a “bum steer”, but Gary persisted. Gary chased down British police authorities, former officers who served in Bosnia, the Bosnian war crimes investigations office in The Hague and universities in the UK as he checked out every element of Urban’s life. Adshead threw up story after story and Urban was eventually forced to quit parliament amid the historic threat of expulsion. It was only then that the incredible extent of Urban’s dishonesty became clear. Among Urban’s bogus claims were that he had a degree from the University of Leeds, that he had a certificate from the University of Portsmouth, and that he investigated war crimes in the Balkans. Urban’s exit from politics forced a by-election, which Labor lost. Judges were impressed by Gary’s tenacious pursuit of the story and its impact on WA politics was significant.

    Sports Report – The Gilmour-Christian Prize – All Media

    Sponsor: Gage Roads Brewing Co.

    Winner: Nick Taylor, Seven West Media: How Rugby Australia signed the Western Force death warrant

    Finalists

    • Tony Barrass, The Sunday Times: Finding Keith Murdoch
    • Paige Taylor, The Australian: Shane Yarran

    Judges’ Comments Taylor’s three entries constitute a truly national news-breaking effort with solid evidence of a disturbing and questionable series of deals that could be traced straight back to the top at Rugby Australia. The stories showed not only that Taylor’s knowledge and connections in national rugby circles are impeccable; they also displayed his ability to cultivate a level of trust from his sources that blew open the inappropriate nature of all the deals Rugby Australia involved itself in while cutting the Western Force from the NRL. This kind if story takes time and effort to co-ordinate, and is a testament to Taylor’s experience and doggedness.

    Columnist – The Matt Price Award – All Media

    Sponsor: The West Australian

    Winner: Emma Young, Fairfax Media/WAtoday: Matters of life and death (and recycling)

    Finalists

    • Bethany Hiatt, Seven West Media: Princess brides
    • Shane Wright, The West Australian: The economic beats

    Judges’ Comments The Matt Price Award was hotly contested and featured passionate pieces from some of the State’s most talented writers, triggering lively debate among the judges. In the end, Emma Young’s entries, particularly “Why my grandma should be left to die”, were both personal and universal, tapping into the issues that affect millions of Australians every day. Young told her grandmother’s story with humour and respect, while conveying the frustration and hopelessness that so many families feel when it comes to aged care and end-of-life issues and decisions. Young used some powerful imagery and emotive language to argue that our society’s “save the life at all costs” mentality was causing more damage than it should. It was a thought-provoking piece that had the readers and the public interest firmly at its heart.

    Multimedia

    Sponsor: Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

    Winner: Emma Young, Soren Frederiksen, Craig Butt, Trisnadi Kurniawan and Mark Stehle, Fairfax Media: Peak hour

    Finalists

    • Charlotte Hamlyn, Liam Phillips and Hugh Sando, ABC: The final move
    • Liam Phillips, Rebecca Turner and Nathanael Scott, ABC: The Perth crime database

    Judges’ Comments This piece fully harnesses the storytelling capacities of multimedia through the engaging, accessible use of data visualisations. The interactive data is made informative and useful with the aid of well-written analysis and broader context. Traffic is always a hot topic that resonates with Perth audiences and importantly this story explores the wider impact of mounting congestion. This is an outstanding example of both collaborative journalism and multimedia-driven sense-making.

    News Story or Feature – Radio/Audio Journalism

    Sponsor: Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance

    Winner: Kirsti Melville, ABC Radio National: Foster care

    Finalists

    • Oliver Peterson and Gareth Parker, Macquarie Media/6PR: John gave me a push… I fell off the chair
    • Damian Smith, ABC Radio Perth: Perth’s struggle: the transition to high-density

    Judges’ Comments Strong long-form reporting on an important subject, this two-part report examines the important contributions to the community of foster carers and foster families and the challenges faced by child protection workers in the Kimberley. The reports are engaging due to Kirsti’s excellent interaction with the subjects of her interviews backed by solid research and thoughtful editing.

    News Story or Feature – Television/Audio-Visual Journalism

    Sponsor: Media Super

    Winner: Charlotte Hamlyn, ABC News: David Goodall

    Finalists

    • Nicolas Perpitch and Robert Koenig-Luck, ABC: Saving Roebourne
    • Kelly Williams, Nine Network: Craster story

    Highly Commended Nicolas Perpitch and Robert Koenig-Luck, ABC: Saving Roebourne Judges’ Comments The judges said that voluntary euthanasia is a sensitive topic that requires ethical and delicate reporting. Charlotte Hamlyn’s coverage of David Goodall’s bid to end his life was just that. Trust between her and Dr Goodall was developed over many years, and Charlotte was allowed to be a part of his final, private moments, and tell Dr Goodall’s story with dignity. Charlotte accurately captured and painted an intimate picture of a fragile, elderly man who just wanted to die, at a time when Australia is still trying to come to terms with such a divisive subject.

    Best Three Stories or Feature – Suburban – Print/Text

    Presented by WA Public Transport Authority

    Winner: David Cohen